Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

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[PDF] The Best of Roald Dahl Book by Roald Dahl Free Download (520 pages) – blindhypnosis.

Charlie and the chocolate factory Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item. Share to Twitter…. ENCRYPTED DAISY download. For print-disabled users. 14 day loan required to access EPUB and PDF files. IN COLLECTIONS. Books to Borrow.

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

[PDF] The Best of Roald Dahl Book by Roald Dahl Free Download (520 pages) – blindhypnosis.

( Review will shown on site after approval ). Get registered and find other users who want to give their favourite books to good hands!. This children's novel has since been adapted into two major films starring Gene Wilder and Johnny Depp respectively, and has even inspired its own chocolate range.

Willy Wonka Golden Ticket Template – PDF Templates – JotForm.

Charlie and the chocolate factory full movie free download in telugu Downloading movies is a straightforward process that's easy for anyone to tackle, but you should be aware of a number of components before starting. NARRATOR 4: For there is very little that Charlie loves more than chocolate! (Charlie leaves to go to the shop. He walks along and finds a coin stuck in a grate. He asks the audience if it belongs to them. Goes and buys something from the candy man. He then goes back onto stage looking delighted.) BACKGROUND MUSIC CHARLIE: Mum! Dad!. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory is a musical film that was based on Roald Dahl novel, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. This Golden Ticket can be printed in a small piece of paper or card and distribute to your guests or attendees for a Willy Wonka's event theme. If you are an event organizer or party planner that needs a golden ticket.

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

Willy Wonka Golden Ticket Template – PDF Templates – JotForm.

A stunning deluxe edition of Roald Dahl’s beloved Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, featuring —a new introduction by Lev Grossman, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Magicians —cover art by the award-winning cartoonist. 14 day loan required to access EPUB and PDF files. CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY BOOKTALK.

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Read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory online book by Roald Dahl. Full supports all version of your device, includes PDF, ePub and Kindle version. All books format are mobile-friendly. Read online and download as many books as you like for personal use. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory: a play adapted by Richard George. Roald Dahl's much-loved story about how Charlie Bucket wins a ticket to visit Willy Wonka's amazing chocolate factory is turned into a play for children to act. With tips about scenery, props and lighting, the play is easy to stage and there are lots of parts for everyone. Download Charlie And The Chocolate Factory PDF/ePub or read online books in Mobi eBooks. Click Download or Read Online button to get Charlie And The Chocolate Factory book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want. If the content Charlie And The Chocolate Factory not Found or Blank , you must.

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free downloadl

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PDF PUFFIN BOOKS BY ROALD DAHL.

[child prose] Roald Dahl — Charlie and the Chocolate Factory<br><br>This book is fantastic it is about a very poor boy named Charlie Bucket. He always goes to school with out a jacket because they don't have money to buy Charlie things. The setting of the book is an unnamed city; small wooden house on the edge of a great city,a fabled chocolate factory. The conflict is five children who have. Free download or read online Charlie and the Chocolate Factory: A Childrens Play pdf (ePUB) book. The first edition of the novel was published in January 1976, and was written by Richard R. George. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of 0 pages and is available in Paperback format.

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

PDF PUFFIN BOOKS BY ROALD DAHL.

This literature unit is based on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. The gates of Willy Wonka's chocolate factory are being opened for five lucky contest winners.

"Veruca Salt" from 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' Sheet Music in Db Major.

Free Download Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl Ebook Online PDF. Free Download Charlotte Moss: Garden Inspirations by Charlotte Moss Ebook Online PDF. Free Download Chart Sense for Writing: Over 70 Common Sense Charts with Tips and Strategies to Teach 3-8 Writing by Rozlyn Linder Ebook Online PDF. PDF. This FREE worksheet includes 1 page from our Charlie & The Chocolate Factory (Novel Study) Gr. 4-7 resource.This Word Web worksheet allows students to brainstorm words relating to chocolate. This worksheet can be used on its own, or paired with the individual resource. And the best part is, it's FREE.About the full resource, Charlie & The. Explore this Role Play Golden Tickets to Support Teaching on Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory and more exciting fiction resources by creating your very own Twinkl account in seconds!Contains five Willy Wonka golden ticket templates for games and role play.The standard version is ready-to-print or you can download the Editable Version (find this by clicking on the 'More Downloads' button.

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download – Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

"Veruca Salt" from 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' Sheet Music in Db Major.

The other children in this book are nasty little beasts, called: Augustus Gloop – a great big greedy nincompoop; Veruca Salt – a spoiled brat; Violet Beauregarde – a repulsive little gum-chewer; Mike Teavee – a boy who only watches.

PPT – Charlie and the Chocolate Factory PowerPoint presentation | free to download.

Charlieand the Chocolate Factory SCENE ONE The NARRATOR enters in front ofthe curtain. NARRATOR. Welcome to the tale of a delicious adventure in a wonderful land. You can tell it will be delicious – can'tyou smell it already? (He sniffs.) Oh, how I love that gorgeous smell! You've all heard of Cadbury's, Hershey's, Nestles, Wonka – what'sthat?. Sign in. Charlie and the Chocolate F – Google Drive. Sign in.

PPT – Charlie and the Chocolate Factory PowerPoint presentation | free to download.

How to download the “30 Things I Love about Myself by Radhika Sanghani” eBook online from the US, UK, Canada, and the rest of the world? if you want to &hellip. Upload your study docs or become a.

Charlie and the chocolate factory Dahl, Roald Free.

Browse 174 professional charlie chocolate factory stock photos available royalty-free. Detail in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, on display in one of many rooms, George Eastman Museum, Rochester, New York, 2017. Collection of items in several. Roald Dahl Charlie and the chocolate factory. Some reviews of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory 'One of the most popular children's books of all times' – Sunday Times 'Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake have made an important and lasting contribution to children's literature' – Guardian 'A book that requires no introduction as it is probably Dahl's best-known and most-read creation and deservedly so…. 2. $5.00. PDF. This resource contains questions on each chapter of Roald Dahl's novel, 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.'. These worksheets make a perfect homework assignment for students studying the book or they can be done as an in-class activity.Chapters are grouped up as follows:Chapter 1 and 2Chapter 3, 4 a.

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Fantastic Mr. Fox: Someone's been stealing from the three meanest farmers around, and they know the identity of the thief—it's Fantastic Mr. Fox!. This book study for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is sure to keep your students engaged in this award winning novel! You can use all of it or you can pick and choose. Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!.

Download ePub Charlie and the Chocolate Factory By Roald Dahl PDF Epub Free Online.

Download book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory pdf – Noor Library Download book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory pdf Home Roald Dahl British Literature Charlie and the Chocolate Factory The source of the book This book was brought from as under a Creative Commons license, or the author or publishing house agrees to publish the book.

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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (.

Download Charlie And The Chocolate Factory Free Download Book For Free in PDF, EPUB. In order to read online Charlie And The Chocolate Factory Free Download textbook, you need to create a FREE account. Read as many books as you like (Personal use) and Join Over 150.000 Happy Readers. We cannot guarantee that every book is in the library. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory eBook Free Download Register Your account to Download or Read "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory eBook" Books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, Audiobooks and Mobi. Click the Download / Read button now to get the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory eBook" Books, Unlimited Books. Start a month FREE Now.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl (.

University of California, Irvine • EECS 70LA. Due to a planned power outage on Friday, 1/14, between 8am-1pm PST, some services may be impacted. What happens when, one by one, the children disobey Mr. Wonka's orders? In Dahl's most popular story, the nasty are punished and the good are deliciously, sumptuously rewarded. "From the Hardcover edition.&quot.

Free Download Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl Ebook Online PDF.

Independent study of the Newbery Medal book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. It is one of a series of Navigators developed by the Center for Gifted Education at The College of William and Mary as a language arts resource for teachers and students. Chocolate Factory was his, and now our small friend was returning in triumph with his entire family to take over. The passengers in the Lift (just to remind you) were: Charlie Bucket, our hero. Mr Willy Wonka, chocolate-maker extraordinary. Mr and Mrs Bucket, Charlie's father and mother. Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine, Mr Bucket's father and.

Charlie and the chocolate factory pdf free download

Free Download Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl Ebook Online PDF.

What do you think? Write your own comment on this book!. This Novel Study provides a teacher and student section with a variety of activities, chapter questions, crossword, word search, and answer key to create a well-rounded lesson plan.

PDF Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – PDFDrive.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Full Movie Online Free.Charlie and the Chocolate Factory with English Subtitles ready for available now or pre-order on Blu-ray™ disc, DVD, and download to watch any time. Files Movie Charlie and the Chocolate Factory From Streaming like Netflix, Amazon Video. Hulu, Crunchy roll, DiscoveryGO, BBC iPlayer, etc. Buy $14.99. Once you select Rent you'll have 14 days to start watching the movie and 48 hours to finish it. Can't play on this device. Check system requirements. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Rent $3.99. Overview System Requirements Related. Free download or read online The Best of Roald Dahl pdf (ePUB) book. The first edition of the novel was published in 1978, and was written by Roald Dahl. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of 520 pages and is available in Paperback format. The main characters of this fiction, classics story are ,. The book has been awarded with , and many others.

PDF Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – PDFDrive.

"This reproducible study guide consists of lessons to use in conjuntion with a specific novel. Magazine: [PDF] DOWNLOAD READ Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Ebook pdf).

PDF Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator – Cambridge School.

Download Charlie And The Chocolate Factory Free Pdf Book For Free in PDF, EPUB. In order to read online Charlie And The Chocolate Factory Free Pdf textbook, you need to create a FREE account. Read as many books as you like (Personal use) and Join Over 150.000 Happy Readers. We cannot guarantee that every book is in the library. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. 2005 114 minutes. Comedy. Ages 6-12. 581. Add to Wishlist. Take an unforgettable, uniquely magical journey through director Tim Burton's deliciously delightful, whimsically wonderful world of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. When eccentric candy man Willy Wonka promises a lifetime supply of sweets and a tour.

PDF Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator – Cambridge School.

The requested URL was not found on this server. For TheoSome reviews of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory ‘One of the most popular children’s books of all times’ – Sunday Times ‘Roald Dahl and Quentin Blake have made an important and lasting contribution to children’s literature’ – Guardian ‘A book that requires no introduction as it is probably Dahl’s best- known and most-read creation and deservedly so… Brilliant’ – Lovereading4Kids Winner of the Millennium Children’s Book Award (UK, 2000) and nominated as one of the nation’s favourite books in the BBC’s Big Read campaign, 2003Books by Roald Dahl The BFG Boy: Tales of Childhood Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator Danny the Champion of the World George’s Marvellous Medicine Going Solo James and the Giant Peach The Witches Matilda For younger readers The Enormous Crocodile Esio Trot Fantastic Mr Fox The Gira e and the Pelly and Me The Magic Finger The Twits Picture books Dirty Beasts (with Quentin Blake) The Enormous Crocodile (with Quentin Blake) The Minpins (with Patrick Benson) Revolting Rhymes (with Quentin Blake) Teenage ction The Great Automatic Grammatizator and Other Stories Rhyme Stew Skin and Other Stories The Vicar of NibbleswickeThe Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar and Six MorePUFFIN MODERN CLASSICS Roald Dahl was born in 1916 in Wales of Norwegian parents. He was educated in England and went on to work for the Shell Oil Company in Africa. He began writing after a ‘monumental bash on the head’ sustained as an RAF ghter pilot during the Second World War. Roald Dahl is one of the most successful and well known of all children’s writers. His books, which are read by children the world over, include The BFG and The Witches, winner of the 1983 Whitbread Award. Roald Dahl died in 1990 at the age of seventy- four. Quentin Blake is one of Britain’s most successful illustrators. His rst drawings were published in Punch magazine when he was sixteen and still at school. Quentin Blake has illustrated over three hundred books and he was Roald Dahl’s favourite illustrator. He has won many awards and prizes, including the Whitbread Award and the Kate Greenaway Medal. In 1999 he was chosen to be the rst ever Children’s Laureate and in 2005 he was awarded a CBE for services to children’s literature.ROALD DAHL Illustrated by Quentin Blake PUFFINPUFFIN BOOKS Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R ,0RL England Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, USA Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Penguin Canada Inc.) Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd) Penguin Group (Australia), 250 Camberwell Road, Camberwell, Victoria 3124, Australia (a division of Pearson Australia Group Pty Ltd) Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd, 11 Community Centre, Panchsheel Park, New Delhi – 110 017, India Penguin Group (NZ), 67 Apollo Drive, Rosedale, North Shore 0632, New Zealand (a division of Pearson New Zealand Ltd) Penguin Books (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd, 24 Sturdee Avenue, Rosebank, Johannesburg 2196, South Africa Penguin Books Ltd, Registered O ces: 80 Strand, London WC2R ,0RL England pu First published in the USA 1964 Published in Great Britain by George Allen & Unwin 1967 Published in Pu n Books 1973 Reissued with new illustrations 1995 Published in Pu n Modern Classics 1997, 2004 This edition reissued 2010 Text copyright © Roald Dahl Nominee Ltd, 1964 Illustrations copyright © Quentin Blake, 1995 Introduction copyright © Julia Eccleshare, 2004 All rights reserved The moral right of the author and illustrator has been asserted Except in the United States of America, this book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that inwhich it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN: 978-0-141-96061-6Contents 1 Here Comes Charlie 2 Mr Willy Wonka’s Factory 3 Mr Wonka and the Indian Prince 4 The Secret Workers 5 The Golden Tickets 6 The First Two Finders 7 Charlie’s Birthday 8 Two More Golden Tickets Found 9 Grandpa Joe Takes a Gamble 10 The Family Begins to Starve 11 The Miracle 12 What It Said on the Golden Ticket 13 The Big Day Arrives 14 Mr Willy Wonka 15 The Chocolate Room 16 The Oompa-Loompas 17 Augustus Gloop Goes up the Pipe 18 Down the Chocolate River 19 The Inventing Room – Everlasting Gobstoppers and Hair To ee 20 The Great Gum Machine 21 Good-bye Violet 22 Along the Corridor 23 Square Sweets That Look Round 24 Veruca in the Nut Room 25 The Great Glass Lift 26 The Television-Chocolate Room27 Mike Teavee is Sent by Television 28 Only Charlie Left 29 The Other Children Go Home 30 Charlie’s Chocolate FactoryThere are ve children in this book: AUGUSTUS GLOOP A greedy boy VERUCA SALT A girl who is spoiled by her parents VIOLET BEAUREGARDE A girl who chews gum all day long MIKE TEAVEE A boy who does nothing but watch television and CHARLIE BUCKET The hero 1 Here Comes CharlieThese two very old people are the father and mother of Mr Bucket. Their names are Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine. And these two very old people are the father and mother of Mrs Bucket. Their names are Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina.This is Mr Bucket. This is Mrs Bucket. Mr and Mrs Bucket have a small boy whose name is Charlie Bucket. This is Charlie. How d’you do? And how d’you do? And how d’you do again? He is pleased to meet you. The whole of this family – the six grown-ups (count them) and little Charlie Bucket – live together in a small wooden house on the edge of a great town.The house wasn’t nearly large enough for so many people, and life was extremely uncomfortable for them all. There were only two rooms in the place altogether, and there was only one bed. The bed was given to the four old grandparents because they were so old and tired. They were so tired, they never got out of it. Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine on this side, Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina on this side. Mr and Mrs Bucket and little Charlie Bucket slept in the other room, upon mattresses on the oor. In the summertime, this wasn’t too bad, but in the winter, freezing cold draughts blew across the oor all night long, and it was awful. There wasn’t any question of them being able to buy a better house – or even one more bed to sleep in. They were far too poor for that. Mr Bucket was the only person in the family with a job. He worked in a toothpaste factory, where he sat all day long at a benchand screwed the little caps on to the tops of the tubes of toothpaste after the tubes had been lled. But a toothpaste cap-screwer is never paid very much money, and poor Mr Bucket, however hard he worked, and however fast he screwed on the caps, was never able to make enough to buy one half of the things that so large a family needed. There wasn’t even enough money to buy proper food for them all. The only meals they could a ord were bread and margarine for breakfast, boiled potatoes and cabbage for lunch, and cabbage soup for supper. Sundays were a bit better. They all looked forward to Sundays because then, although they had exactly the same, everyone was allowed a second helping. The Buckets, of course, didn’t starve, but every one of them – the two old grandfathers, the two old grandmothers, Charlie’s father, Charlie’s mother, and especially little Charlie himself – went about from morning till night with a horrible empty feeling in their tummies. Charlie felt it worst of all. And although his father and mother often went without their own share of lunch or supper so that they could give it to him, it still wasn’t nearly enough for a growing boy. He desperately wanted something more lling and satisfying than cabbage and cabbage soup. The one thing he longed for more than anything else was… CHOCOLATE. Walking to school in the mornings, Charlie could see great slabs of chocolate piled up high in the shop windows, and he would stop and stare and press his nose against the glass, his mouth watering like mad. Many times a day, he would see other children taking bars of creamy chocolate out of their pockets and munching them greedily, and that, of course, was pure torture. Only once a year, on his birthday, did Charlie Bucket ever get to taste a bit of chocolate. The whole family saved up their money for that special occasion, and when the great day arrived, Charlie was always presented with one small chocolate bar to eat all by himself. And each time he received it, on those marvellous birthday mornings, he would place it carefully in a small wooden box that he owned, and treasure it as though it were a bar of solid gold; and forthe next few days, he would allow himself only to look at it, but never to touch it. Then at last, when he could stand it no longer, he would peel back a tiny bit of the paper wrapping at one corner to expose a tiny bit of chocolate, and then he would take a tiny nibble – just enough to allow the lovely sweet taste to spread out slowly over his tongue. The next day, he would take another tiny nibble, and so on, and so on. And in this way, Charlie would make his sixpenny bar of birthday chocolate last him for more than a month. But I haven’t yet told you about the one awful thing that tortured little Charlie, the lover of chocolate, more than anything else. This thing, for him, was far, far worse than seeing slabs of chocolate in the shop windows or watching other children munching bars of creamy chocolate right in front of him. It was the most terrible torturing thing you could imagine, and it was this: In the town itself, actually within sight of the house in which Charlie lived, there was an ENORMOUS CHOCOLATE FACTORY! Just imagine that! And it wasn’t simply an ordinary enormous chocolate factory, either. It was the largest and most famous in the whole world! It was WONKA’S FACTORY, owned by a man called Mr Willy Wonka, the greatest inventor and maker of chocolates that there has ever been. And what a tremendous, marvellous place it was! It had huge iron gates leading into it, and a high wall surrounding it, and smoke belching from its chimneys, and strange whizzing sounds coming from deep inside it. And outside the walls, for half a mile around in every direction, the air was scented with the heavy rich smell of melting chocolate! Twice a day, on his way to and from school, little Charlie Bucket had to walk right past the gates of the factory. And every time he went by, he would begin to walk very, very slowly, and he would hold his nose high in the air and take long deep sni s of the gorgeous chocolatey smell all around him. Oh, how he loved that smell!And oh, how he wished he could go inside the factory and see what it was like!2 Mr Willy Wonka’s Factory In the evenings, after he had nished his supper of watery cabbage soup, Charlie always went into the room of his four grandparents to listen to their stories, and then afterwards to say good night. Every one of these old people was over ninety. They were as shrivelled as prunes, and as bony as skeletons, and throughout the day, until Charlie made his appearance, they lay huddled in their one bed, two at either end, with nightcaps on to keep their heads warm, dozing the time away with nothing to do. But as soon as they heard the door opening, and heard Charlie’s voice saying, ‘Good evening, Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine, and Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina,’ then all four of them would suddenly sit up, and their old wrinkled faces would light up with smiles of pleasure – and the talking would begin. For they loved this little boy. He was the only bright thing in their lives, and his evening visits were something that they looked forward to all day long. Often, Charlie’s mother and father would come in as well, and stand by the door, listening to the stories that the old people told; and thus, for perhaps half an hour every night, this room would become a happy place, and the whole family would forget that it was hungry and poor. One evening, when Charlie went in to see his grandparents, he said to them, ‘Is it really true that Wonka’s Chocolate Factory is the biggest in the world?’ ‘True?’ cried all four of them at once. ‘Of course it’s true! Good heavens, didn’t you know that? It’s about fty times as big as any other!’‘And is Mr Willy Wonka really the cleverest chocolate maker in the world?’ ‘My dear boy,’ said Grandpa Joe, raising himself up a little higher on his pillow, ‘Mr Willy Wonka is the most amazing, the most fantastic, the most extraordinary chocolate maker the world has ever seen! I thought everybody knew that!’ ‘I knew he was famous, Grandpa Joe, and I knew he was very clever…’ ‘Clever!’ cried the old man. ‘He’s more than that! He’s a magician with chocolate! He can make anything – anything he wants! Isn’t that a fact, my dears?’ The other three old people nodded their heads slowly up and down, and said, ‘Absolutely true. Just as true as can be.’ And Grandpa Joe said, ‘You mean to say I’ve never told you about Mr Willy Wonka and his factory?’ ‘Never,’ answered little Charlie. ‘Good heavens above! I don’t know what’s the matter with me!’ ‘Will you tell me now, Grandpa Joe, please?’ ‘I certainly will. Sit down beside me on the bed, my dear, and listen carefully.’Grandpa Joe was the oldest of the four grandparents. He was ninety-six and a half, and that is just about as old as anybody can be. Like all extremely old people, he was delicate and weak, and throughout the day he spoke very little. But in the evenings, when Charlie, his beloved grandson, was in the room, he seemed in some marvellous way to grow quite young again. All his tiredness fell away from him, and he became as eager and excited as a young boy. ‘Oh, what a man he is, this Mr Willy Wonka!’ cried Grandpa Joe. ‘Did you know, for example, that he has himself invented more than two hundred new kinds of chocolate bars, each with a di erent centre, each far sweeter and creamier and more delicious than anything the other chocolate factories can make!’ ‘Perfectly true!’ cried Grandma Josephine. ‘And he sends them to all the four corners of the earth! Isn’t that so, Grandpa Joe?’ ‘It is, my dear, it is. And to all the kings and presidents of the world as well. But it isn’t only chocolate bars that he makes. Oh, dear me, no! He has some really fantastic inventions up his sleeve, Mr Willy Wonka has! Did you know that he’s invented a way of making chocolate ice cream so that it stays cold for hours and hours without being in the refrigerator? You can even leave it lying in the sun all morning on a hot day and it won’t go runny!’ ‘But that’s impossible!’ said little Charlie, staring at his grandfather.‘Of course it’s impossible!’ cried Grandpa Joe. ‘It’s completely absurd! But Mr Willy Wonka has done it!’ ‘Quite right!’ the others agreed, nodding their heads. ‘Mr Wonka has done it.’ ‘And then again,’ Grandpa Joe went on speaking very slowly now so that Charlie wouldn’t miss a word, ‘Mr Willy Wonka can make marshmallows that taste of violets, and rich caramels that change colour every ten seconds as you suck them, and little feathery sweets that melt away deliriously the moment you put them between your lips. He can make chewing-gum that never loses its taste, and sugar balloons that you can blow up to enormous sizes before you pop them with a pin and gobble them up. And, by a most secret method, he can make lovely blue birds’ eggs with black spots on them, and when you put one of these in your mouth, it gradually gets smaller and smaller until suddenly there is nothing left except a tiny little pink sugary baby bird sitting on the tip of your tongue.’ Grandpa Joe paused and ran the point of his tongue slowly over his lips. ‘It makes my mouth water just thinking about it,’ he said. ‘Mine, too,’ said little Charlie. ‘But please go on.’ While they were talking, Mr and Mrs Bucket, Charlie’s mother and father, had come quietly into the room, and now both were standing just inside the door, listening. ‘Tell Charlie about that crazy Indian prince,’ said Grandma Josephine. ‘He’d like to hear that.’ ‘You mean Prince Pondicherry?’ said Grandpa Joe, and he began chuckling with laughter. ‘Completely dotty!’ said Grandpa George. ‘But very rich,’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘What did he do?’ asked Charlie eagerly. ‘Listen,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘and I’ll tell you.’3 Mr Wonka and the Indian Prince ‘Prince Pondicherry wrote a letter to Mr Willy Wonka,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘and asked him to come all the way out to India and build him a colossal palace entirely out of chocolate.’ ‘Did Mr Wonka do it, Grandpa?’ ‘He did, indeed. And what a palace it was! It had one hundred rooms, and everything was made of either dark or light chocolate! The bricks were chocolate, and the cement holding them together was chocolate, and the windows were chocolate, and all the walls and ceilings were made of chocolate, so were the carpets and the pictures and the furniture and the beds; and when you turned on the taps in the bathroom, hot chocolate came pouring out. ‘When it was all nished, Mr Wonka said to Prince Pondicherry, “I warn you, though, it won’t last very long, so you’d better start eating it right away.” ‘ “Nonsense!” shouted the Prince. “I’m not going to eat my palace! I’m not even going to nibble the staircase or lick the walls! I’m going to live in it!” ‘But Mr Wonka was right, of course, because soon after this, there came a very hot day with a boiling sun, and the whole palace began to melt, and then it sank slowly to the ground, and the crazy prince, who was dozing in the living room at the time, woke up to nd himself swimming around in a huge brown sticky lake of chocolate.’ Little Charlie sat very still on the edge of the bed, staring at his grandfather. Charlie’s face was bright, and his eyes were stretched so wide you could see the whites all around. ‘Is all this really true?’ he asked. ‘Or are you pulling my leg?’‘It’s true!’ cried all four of the old people at once. ‘Of course it’s true! Ask anyone you like!’ ‘And I’ll tell you something else that’s true,’ said Grandpa Joe, and now he leaned closer to Charlie, and lowered his voice to a soft, secret whisper. ‘Nobody… ever… comes… out!’ ‘Out of where?’ asked Charlie. ‘And… nobody… ever… goes… in!’ ‘In where?’ cried Charlie. ‘Wonka’s factory, of course!’ ‘Grandpa, what do you mean?’ ‘I mean workers, Charlie.’ ‘Workers?’ ‘All factories,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘have workers streaming in and out of the gates in the mornings and evenings – except Wonka’s! Have you ever seen a single person going into that place – or coming out?’ Little Charlie looked slowly around at each of the four old faces, one after the other, and they all looked back at him. They were friendly smiling faces, but they were also quite serious. There was no sign of joking or leg-pulling on any of them. ‘Well? Have you?’ asked Grandpa Joe. ‘I… I really don’t know, Grandpa,’ Charlie stammered. ‘Whenever I walk past the factory, the gates seem to be closed.’ ‘Exactly!’ said Grandpa Joe. ‘But there must be people working there…’ ‘Not people, Charlie. Not ordinary people, anyway.’ ‘Then who?’ cried Charlie. ‘Ah-ha… That’s it, you see… That’s another of Mr Willy Wonka’s clevernesses.’ ‘Charlie, dear,’ Mrs Bucket called out from where she was standing by the door, ‘it’s time for bed. That’s enough for tonight.’ ‘But, Mother, I must hear…’‘Tomorrow, my darling…’ ‘That’s right,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘I’ll tell you the rest of it tomorrow evening.’4 The Secret Workers The next evening, Grandpa Joe went on with his story. ‘You see, Charlie,’ he said, ‘not so very long ago there used to be thousands of people working in Mr Willy Wonka’s factory. Then one day, all of a sudden, Mr Wonka had to ask every single one of them to leave, to go home, never to come back.’ ‘But why?’ asked Charlie. ‘Because of spies.’ ‘Spies?’ ‘Yes. All the other chocolate makers, you see, had begun to grow jealous of the wonderful sweets that Mr Wonka was making, and they started sending in spies to steal his secret recipes. The spies took jobs in the Wonka factory, pretending that they were ordinary workers, and while they were there, each one of them found out exactly how a certain special thing was made.’ ‘And did they go back to their own factories and tell?’ asked Charlie. ‘They must have,’ answered Grandpa Joe, ‘because soon after that, Fickelgruber’s factory started making an ice cream that would never melt, even in the hottest sun. Then Mr Prodnose’s factory came out with a chewing-gum that never lost its avour however much you chewed it. And then Mr Slugworth’s factory began making sugar balloons that you could blow up to huge sizes before you popped them with a pin and gobbled them up. And so on, and so on. And Mr Willy Wonka tore his beard and shouted, “This is terrible! I shall be ruined! There are spies everywhere! I shall have to close the factory!” ’ ‘But he didn’t do that!’ Charlie said.‘Oh, yes he did. He told all the workers that he was sorry, but they would have to go home. Then, he shut the main gates and fastened them with a chain. And suddenly, Wonka’s giant chocolate factory became silent and deserted. The chimneys stopped smoking, the machines stopped whirring, and from then on, not a single chocolate or sweet was made. Not a soul went in or out, and even Mr Willy Wonka himself disappeared completely. ‘Months and months went by,’ Grandpa Joe went on, ‘but still the factory remained closed. And everybody said, “Poor Mr Wonka. He was so nice. And he made such marvellous things. But he’s nished now. It’s all over.” ‘Then something astonishing happened. One day, early in the morning, thin columns of white smoke were seen to be coming out of the tops of the tall chimneys of the factory! People in the town stopped and stared. “What’s going on?” they cried. “Someone’s lit the furnaces! Mr Wonka must be opening up again!” They ran to the gates, expecting to see them wide open and Mr Wonka standing there to welcome his workers back. ‘But no! The great iron gates were still locked and chained as securely as ever, and Mr Wonka was nowhere to be seen. ‘ “But the factory is working!” the people shouted. “Listen! You can hear the machines! They’re all whirring again! And you can smell the smell of melting chocolate in the air!” ’ Grandpa Joe leaned forward and laid a long bony nger on Charlie’s knee, and he said softly, ‘But most mysterious of all, Charlie, were the shadows in the windows of the factory. The peoplestanding on the street outside could see small dark shadows moving about behind the frosted glass windows.’ ‘Shadows of whom?’ said Charlie quickly. ‘That’s exactly what everybody else wanted to know. ‘ “The place is full of workers!” the people shouted. “But nobody’s gone in! The gates are locked! It’s crazy! Nobody ever comes out, either!” ‘But there was no question at all,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘that the factory was running. And it’s gone on running ever since, for these last ten years. What’s more, the chocolates and sweets it’s been turning out have become more fantastic and delicious all the time. And of course now when Mr Wonka invents some new and wonderful sweet, neither Mr Fickelgruber nor Mr Prodnose nor Mr Slugworth nor anybody else is able to copy it. No spies can go into the factory to nd out how it is made.’ ‘But Grandpa, who,’ cried Charlie, ‘who is Mr Wonka using to do all the work in the factory?’ ‘Nobody knows, Charlie.’ ‘But that’s ahsurd! Hasn’t someone asked Mr Wonka?’ ‘Nobody sees him any more. He never comes out. The only things that come out of that place are chocolates and sweets. They come out through a special trap door in the wall, all packed and addressed, and they are picked up every day by Post O ce trucks.’ ‘But Grandpa, what sort of people are they that work in there?’ ‘My dear boy,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘that is one of the great mysteries of the chocolate-making world. We know only one thing about them. They are very small. The faint shadows that sometimes appear behind the windows, especially late at night when the lights are on, are those of tiny people, people no taller than my knee…’ ‘There aren’t any such people,’ Charlie said. Just then, Mr Bucket, Charlie’s father, came into the room. He was home from the toothpaste factory, and he was waving an evening newspaper rather excitedly. ‘Have you heard the news?’ hecried. He held up the paper so that they could see the huge headline. The headline said: WONKA FACTORY TO BE OPENED AT LAST TO LUCKY FEW5 The Golden Tickets ‘You mean people are actually going to be allowed to go inside the factory?’ cried Grandpa Joe. ‘Read us what it says – quickly!’ ‘All right,’ said Mr Bucket, smoothing out the newspaper. ‘Listen.’ Evening Bulletin Mr Willy Wonka, the confectionery genius whom nobody has seen for the last tenyears, sent out the following notice today: I, Willy Wonka, have decided to allow ve children – just ve, mind you, and no more – to visit my factory this year. These lucky ve will be shown around personally by me, and they will be allowed to see all the secrets and the magic of my factory. Then, at the end of the tour, as a special present, all of them will be given enough chocolates and sweets to last them for the rest of their lives! So watch out for the Golden Tickets! Five Golden Tickets have beenprinted on golden paper, and these ve Golden Tickets have been hidden underneath the ordinary wrapping paper of ve ordinary bars of chocolate. These ve chocolate bars may be anywhere – in any shop in any street in any town in any country in the world – upon any counter where Wonka’s Sweets are sold. And the ve lucky nders of these ve Golden Tickets are the only ones who will be allowed to visit my factory and see what it’s like now inside! Good luck to you all, and happy hunting! (Signed Willy Wonka.) ‘The man’s dotty!’ muttered Grandma Josephine.‘He’s brilliant!’ cried Grandpa Joe. ‘He’s a magician! Just imagine what will happen now! The whole world will be searching for those Golden Tickets! Everyone will be buying Wonka’s chocolate bars in the hope of nding one! He’ll sell more than ever before! Oh, how exciting it would be to nd one!’ ‘And all the chocolate and sweets that you could eat for the rest of your life – free!’ said Grandpa George. ‘Just imagine that!’ ‘They’d have to deliver them in a truck!’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘It makes me quite ill to think of it,’ said Grandma Josephine. ‘Nonsense!’ cried Grandpa Joe. ‘Wouldn’t it be something, Charlie, to open a bar of chocolate and see a Golden Ticket glistening inside!’ ‘It certainly would, Grandpa. But there isn’t a hope,’ Charlie said sadly. ‘I only get one bar a year.’ ‘You never know, darling,’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘It’s your birthday next week. You have as much chance as anybody else.’ ‘I’m afraid that simply isn’t true,’ said Grandpa George. ‘The kids who are going to nd the Golden Tickets are the ones who can a ord to buy bars of chocolate every day. Our Charlie gets only one a year. There isn’t a hope.’6 The First Two Finders The very next day, the rst Golden Ticket was found. The nder was a boy called Augustus Gloop, and Mr Bucket’s evening newspaper carried a large picture of him on the front page. The picture showed a nine-year-old boy who was so enormously fat he looked as though he had been blown up with a powerful pump. Great abby folds of fat bulged out from every part of his body, and his face was like a monstrous ball of dough with two small greedy curranty eyes peering out upon the world. The town in which Augustus Gloop lived, the newspaper said, had gone wild with excitement over their hero. Flags were ying from all the windows, children had been given a holiday from school, and a parade was being organized in honour of the famous youth. ‘I just knew Augustus would nd a Golden Ticket,’ his mother had told the newspapermen. ‘He eats so many bars of chocolate a day that it was almost impossible for him not to nd one. Eating is his hobby, you know. That’s all he’s interested in. But still, that’s better than being a hooligan and shooting o zip guns and things like that in his spare time, isn’t it? And what I always say is, he wouldn’t go on eating like he does unless he needed nourishment, would he? It’s all vitamins, anyway. What a thrill it will be for him to visit Mr Wonka’s marvellous factory! We’re just as proud as anything!’‘What a revolting woman,’ said Grandma Josephine. ‘And what a repulsive boy,’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘Only four Golden Tickets left,’ said Grandpa George. ‘I wonder who’ll get those.’ And now the whole country, indeed, the whole world, seemed suddenly to be caught up in a mad chocolate-buying spree, everybody searching frantically for those precious remaining tickets. Fully grown women were seen going into sweet shops and buying ten Wonka bars at a time, then tearing o the wrappers on the spot and peering eagerly underneath for a glint of golden paper. Children were taking hammers and smashing their piggy banks and running out to the shops with handfuls of money. In one city, a famous gangster robbed a bank of a thousand pounds and spent the whole lot on Wonka bars that same afternoon. And when the police entered his house to arrest him, they found him sitting on the oor amidst mountains of chocolate, ripping o the wrappers with the blade of a long dagger. In far-o Russia, a woman called Charlotte Russe claimed to have found the second ticket, but it turned out tobe a clever fake. The famous English scientist, Professor Foulbody, invented a machine which would tell you at once, without opening the wrapper of a bar of chocolate, whether or not there was a Golden Ticket hidden underneath it. The machine had a mechanical arm that shot out with tremendous force and grabbed hold of anything that had the slightest bit of gold inside it, and for a moment, it looked like the answer to everything. But unfortunately, while the Professor was showing o the machine to the public at the sweet counter of a large department store, the mechanical arm shot out and made a grab for the gold lling in the back tooth of a duchess who was standing near by. There was an ugly scene, and the machine was smashed by the crowd. Suddenly, on the day before Charlie Bucket’s birthday, the newspapers announced that the second Golden Ticket had been found. The lucky person was a small girl called Veruca Salt who lived with her rich parents in a great city far away. Once again Mr Bucket’s evening newspaper carried a big picture of the nder. She was sitting between her beaming father and mother in the living room of their house, waving the Golden Ticket above her head, and grinning from ear to ear. Veruca’s father, Mr Salt, had eagerly explained to the newspapermen exactly how the ticket was found. ‘You see, boys,’ hehad said, ‘as soon as my little girl told me that she simply had to have one of those Golden Tickets, I went out into the town and started buying up all the Wonka bars I could lay my hands on. Thousands of them, I must have bought. Hundreds of thousands! Then I had them loaded on to trucks and sent directly to my own factory. I’m in the peanut business, you see, and I’ve got about a hundred women working for me over at my place, shelling peanuts for roasting and salting. That’s what they do all day long, those women, they sit there shelling peanuts. So I says to them, “Okay, girls,” I says, “from now on, you can stop shelling peanuts and start shelling the wrappers o these chocolate bars instead!” And they did. I had every worker in the place yanking the paper o those bars of chocolate full speed ahead from morning till night. ‘But three days went by, and we had no luck. Oh, it was terrible! My little Veruca got more and more upset each day, and every time I went home she would scream at me, “Where’s my Golden Ticket! I want my Golden Ticket!” And she would lie for hours on the oor, kicking and yelling in the most disturbing way. Well, I just hated to see my little girl feeling unhappy like that, so I vowed I would keep up the search until I’d got her what she wanted. Then suddenly… on the evening of the fourth day, one of my women workers yelled, “I’ve got it! A Golden Ticket!” And I said, “Give it to me, quick!” and she did, and I rushed it home and gave it to my darling Veruca, and now she’s all smiles, and we have a happy home once again.’ ‘That’s even worse than the fat boy,’ said Grandma Josephine. ‘She needs a really good spanking,’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘I don’t think the girl’s father played it quite fair, Grandpa, do you?’ Charlie murmured. ‘He spoils her,’ Grandpa Joe said. ‘And no good can ever come from spoiling a child like that, Charlie, you mark my words.’ ‘Come to bed, my darling,’ said Charlie’s mother. ‘Tomorrow’s your birthday, don’t forget that, so I expect you’ll be up early to open your present.’‘A Wonka chocolate bar!’ cried Charlie. ‘It is a Wonka bar, isn’t it?’ ‘Yes, my love,’ his mother said. ‘Of course it is.’ ‘Oh, wouldn’t it be wonderful if I found the third Golden Ticket inside it?’ Charlie said. ‘Bring it in here when you get it,’ Grandpa Joe said. ‘Then we can all watch you taking o the wrapper.’7 Charlie’s Birthday ‘Happy birthday!’ cried the four old grandparents, as Charlie came into their room early the next morning. Charlie smiled nervously and sat down on the edge of the bed. He was holding his present, his only present, very carefully in his two hands. WONKA’S WHIPPLE-SCRUMPTIOUS FUDGEMALLOW DELIGHT, it said on the wrapper. The four old people, two at either end of the bed, propped themselves up on their pillows and stared with anxious eyes at the bar of chocolate in Charlie’s hands. Mr and Mrs Bucket came in and stood at the foot of the bed, watching Charlie. The room became silent. Everybody was waiting now for Charlie to start opening his present. Charlie looked down at the bar of chocolate. He ran his ngers slowly back and forth along the length of it, stroking it lovingly, and the shiny paper wrapper made little sharp crackly noises in the quiet room. Then Mrs Bucket said gently, ‘You mustn’t be too disappointed, my darling, if you don’t nd what you’re looking for underneath that wrapper. You really can’t expect to be as lucky as all that.’ ‘She’s quite right,’ Mr Bucket said. Charlie didn’t say anything. ‘After all,’ Grandma Josephine said, ‘in the whole wide world there are only three tickets left to be found.’ ‘The thing to remember,’ Grandma Georgina said, ‘is that whatever happens, you’ll still have the bar of chocolate.’‘Wonka’s Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight!’ cried Grandpa George. ‘It’s the best of them all! You’ll just love it!’ ‘Yes,’ Charlie whispered. ‘I know.’ ‘Just forget all about those Golden Tickets and enjoy the chocolate,’ Grandpa Joe said. ‘Why don’t you do that?’ They all knew it was ridiculous to expect this one poor little bar of chocolate to have a magic ticket inside it, and they were trying as gently and as kindly as they could to prepare Charlie for the disappointment. But there was one other thing that the grown-ups also knew, and it was this: that however small the chance might be of striking lucky, the chance was there. The chance had to be there. This particular bar of chocolate had as much chance as any other of having a Golden Ticket. And that was why all the grandparents and parents in the room were actually just as tense and excited as Charlie was, although they were pretending to be very calm. ‘You’d better go ahead and open it up, or you’ll be late for school,’ Grandpa Joe said. ‘You might as well get it over with,’ Grandpa George said. ‘Open it, my dear,’ Grandma Georgina said. ‘Please open it. You’re making me jumpy.’ Very slowly, Charlie’s ngers began to tear open one small corner of the wrapping paper. The old people in the bed all leaned forward, craning their scraggy necks.Then suddenly, as though he couldn’t bear the suspense any longer, Charlie tore the wrapper right down the middle… and on to his lap, there fell… a light-brown creamy-coloured bar of chocolate. There was no sign of a Golden Ticket anywhere. ‘Well – that’s that!’ said Grandpa Joe brightly. ‘It’s just what we expected.’ Charlie looked up. Four kind old faces were watching him intently from the bed. He smiled at them, a small sad smile, and then he shrugged his shoulders and picked up the chocolate bar and held it out to his mother, and said, ‘Here, Mother, have a bit. We’ll share it. I want everybody to taste it.’ ‘Certainly not!’ his mother said. And the others all cried, ‘No, no! We wouldn’t dream of it! It’s all yours!’ ‘Please,’ begged Charlie, turning round and o ering it to Grandpa Joe. But neither he nor anyone else would take even a tiny bit. ‘It’s time to go to school, my darling,’ Mrs Bucket said, putting an arm around Charlie’s skinny shoulders. ‘Come on, or you’ll be late.’8 Two More Golden Tickets Found That evening, Mr Bucket’s newspaper announced the nding of not only the third Golden Ticket, but the fourth as well. TWO GOLDEN TICKETS FOUND TODAY, screamed the headlines. ONLY ONE MORE LEFT. ‘All right,’ said Grandpa Joe, when the whole family was gathered in the old people’s room after supper, ‘let’s hear who found them.’ ‘The third ticket,’ read Mr Bucket, holding the newspaper up close to his face because his eyes were bad and he couldn’t a ord glasses, ‘the third ticket was found by a Miss Violet Beauregarde. There was great excitement in the Beauregarde household when our reporter arrived to interview the lucky young lady – cameras were clicking and ashbulbs were ashing and people were pushing and jostling and trying to get a bit closer to the famous girl. And the famous girl was standing on a chair in the living room waving the Golden Ticket madly at arm’s length as though she were agging a taxi. She was talking very fast and very loudly to everyone, but it was not easy to hear all that she said because she was chewing so ferociously upon a piece of gum at the same time.‘ “I’m a gum chewer, normally,” she shouted, “but when I heard about these ticket things of Mr Wonka’s, I gave up gum and started on chocolate bars in the hope of striking lucky. Now, of course, I’m back on gum. I just adore gum. I can’t do without it. I munch it all day long except for a few minutes at mealtimes when I take it out and stick it behind my ear for safekeeping. To tell you the truth, I simply wouldn’t feel comfortable if I didn’t have that little wedge of gum to chew on every moment of the day, I really wouldn’t. My mother says it’s not ladylike and it looks ugly to see a girl’s jaws going up and down like mine do all the time, but I don’t agree. And who’s she to criticize, anyway, because if you ask me, I’d say that her jaws are going up and down almost as much as mine are just from yelling at me every minute of the day.” ‘ “Now, Violet,” Mrs Beauregarde said from a far corner of the room where she was standing on the piano to avoid being trampled by the mob. ‘ “All right, Mother, keep your hair on!” Miss Beauregarde shouted. “And now,” she went on, turning to the reporters again, “it may interest you to know that this piece of gum I’m chewing right at this moment is one I’ve been working on for over three months solid. That’s a record, that is. It’s beaten the record held by my best friend, Miss Cornelia Prinzmetel. And was she furious! It’s my mosttreasured possession now, this piece of gum is. At night-time, I just stick it on the end of the bedpost, and it’s as good as ever in the mornings -a bit hard at rst, maybe, but it soon softens up again after I’ve given it a few good chews. Before I started chewing for the world record, I used to change my piece of gum once a day. I used to do it in our lift on the way home from school. Why the lift? Because I liked sticking the gooey piece that I’d just nished with on to one of the control buttons. Then the next person who came along and pressed the button got my old gum on the end of his or her nger. Ha-ha! And what a racket they kicked up, some of them. You get the best results with women who have expensive gloves on. Oh yes, I’m thrilled to be going to Mr Wonka’s factory. And I understand that afterwards he’s going to give me enough gum to last me for the rest of my whole life. Whoopee! Hooray!” ’ ‘Beastly girl,’ said Grandma Josephine. ‘Despicable!’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘She’ll come to a sticky end one day, chewing all that gum, you see if she doesn’t.’ ‘And who got the fourth Golden Ticket?’ Charlie asked. ‘Now, let me see,’ said Mr Bucket, peering at the newspaper again. ‘Ah yes, here we are. The fourth Golden Ticket,’ he read, ‘was found by a boy called Mike Teavee.’ ‘Another bad lot, I’ll be bound,’ muttered Grandma Josephine. ‘Don’t interrupt, Grandma,’ said Mrs Bucket. ‘The Teavee household,’ said Mr Bucket, going on with his reading, ‘was crammed, like all the others, with excited visitors when our reporter arrived, but young Mike Teavee, the lucky winner, seemed extremely annoyed by the whole business. “Can’t you fools see I’m watching television?” he said angrily. “I wish you wouldn’t interrupt!” ‘The nine-year-old boy was seated before an enormous television set, with his eyes glued to the screen, and he was watching a lm in which one bunch of gangsters was shooting up another bunch of gangsters with machine guns. Mike Teavee himself had no less than eighteen toy pistols of various sizes hanging from belts around hisbody, and every now and again he would leap up into the air and re o half a dozen rounds from one or another of these weapons. ‘ “Quiet!” he shouted, when someone tried to ask him a question. “Didn’t I tell you not to interrupt! This show’s an absolute whiz- banger! It’s terri c! I watch it every day. I watch all of them every day, even the rotten ones, where there’s no shooting. I like the gangsters best. They’re terri c, those gangsters! Especially when they start pumping each other full of lead, or ashing the old stilettos, or giving each other the one-two-three with their knuckledusters! Gosh, what wouldn’t I give to be doing that myself! It’s the life, I tell you! It’s terri c!” ’ ‘That’s quite enough!’ snapped Grandma Josephine. ‘I can’t bear to listen to it!’ ‘Nor me,’ said Grandma Georgina. ‘Do all children behave like this nowadays – like these brats we’ve been hearing about?’ ‘Of course not,’ said Mr Bucket, smiling at the old lady in the bed. ‘Some do, of course. In fact, quite a lot of them do. But not all.’ ‘And now there’s only one ticket left!’ said Grandpa George. ‘Quite so,’ sni ed Grandma Georgina. ‘And just as sure as I’ll be having cabbage soup for supper tomorrow, that ticket’ll go to some nasty little beast who doesn’t deserve it!’9 Grandpa Joe Takes a Gamble The next day, when Charlie came home from school and went in to see his grandparents, he found that only Grandpa Joe was awake. The other three were all snoring loudly. ‘Ssshh!’ whispered Grandpa Joe, and he beckoned Charlie to come closer. Charlie tiptoed over and stood beside the bed. The old man gave Charlie a sly grin, and then he started rummaging under his pillow with one hand; and when the hand came out again, there was an ancient leather purse clutched in the ngers. Under cover of the bedclothes, the old man opened the purse and tipped it upside down. Out fell a single silver sixpence. ‘It’s my secret hoard,’ he whispered. ‘The others don’t know I’ve got it. And now, you and I are going to have one more ing at nding that last ticket. How about it, eh? But you’ll have to help me.’ ‘Are you sure you want to spend your money on that, Grandpa?’ Charlie whispered. ‘Of course I’m sure!’ spluttered the old man excitedly. ‘Don’t stand there arguing! I’m as keen as you are to nd that ticket! Here – take the money and run down the street to the nearest shop and buy the rst Wonka bar you see and bring it straight back to me, and we’ll open it together.’ Charlie took the little silver coin, and slipped quickly out of the room. In ve minutes, he was back. ‘Have you got it?’ whispered Grandpa Joe, his eyes shining with excitement. Charlie nodded and held out the bar of chocolate. WONKA’S NUTTY CRUNCH SURPRISE, it said on the wrapper.‘Good!’ the old man whispered, sitting up in the bed and rubbing his hands. ‘Now – come over here and sit close to me and we’ll open it together. Are you ready?’ ‘Yes,’ Charlie said. ‘I’m ready.’ ‘All right. You tear o the rst bit.’ ‘No,’ Charlie said, ‘you paid for it. You do it all.’ The old man’s ngers were trembling most terribly as they fumbled with the wrapper. ‘We don’t have a hope, really,’ he whispered, giggling a bit. ‘You do know we don’t have a hope, don’t you?’ ‘Yes,’ Charlie said. ‘I know that.’ They looked at each other, and both started giggling nervously. ‘Mind you,’ said Grandpa Joe, ‘there is just that tiny chance that it might be the one, don’t you agree?’ ‘Yes,’ Charlie said. ‘Of course. Why don’t you open it, Grandpa?’ ‘All in good time, my boy, all in good time. Which end do you think I ought to open rst?’ ‘That corner. The one furthest from you. Just tear o a tiny bit, but not quite enough for us to see anything.’ ‘Like that?’ said the old man. ‘Yes. Now a little bit more.’ ‘You nish it,’ said Grandpa Joe. ‘I’m too nervous.’ ‘No, Grandpa. You must do it yourself.’ ‘Very well, then. Here goes.’ He tore o the wrapper. They both stared at what lay underneath. It was a bar of chocolate – nothing more. All at once, they both saw the funny side of the whole thing, and they burst into peals of laughter. ‘What on earth’s going on!’ cried Grandma Josephine, waking up suddenly. ‘Nothing,’ said Grandpa Joe. ‘You go on back to sleep.’10 The Family Begins to Starve During the next two weeks, the weather turned very cold. First came the snow. It began very suddenly one morning just as Charlie Bucket was getting dressed for school. Standing by the window, he saw the huge akes drifting slowly down out of an icy sky that was the colour of steel. By evening, it lay four feet deep around the tiny house, and Mr Bucket had to dig a path from the front door to the road. After the snow, there came a freezing gale that blew for days and days without stopping. And oh, how bitter cold it was! Everything that Charlie touched seemed to be made of ice, and each time he stepped outside the door, the wind was like a knife on his cheek. Inside the house, little jets of freezing air came rushing in through the sides of the windows and under the doors, and there was no place to go to escape them. The four old ones lay silent and huddled in their bed, trying to keep the cold out of their bones. The excitement over the Golden Tickets had long since been forgotten. Nobody in the family gave a thought now to anything except the two vital problems of trying to keep warm and trying to get enough to eat. There is something about very cold weather that gives one an enormous appetite. Most of us nd ourselves beginning to crave rich steaming stews and hot apple pies and all kinds of delicious warming dishes; and because we are all a great deal luckier than we realize, we usually get what we want – or near enough. But Charlie Bucket never got what he wanted because the family couldn’t a ord it, and as the cold weather went on and on, he became ravenously and desperately hungry. Both bars of chocolate, the birthday oneand the one Grandpa Joe had bought, had long since been nibbled away, and all he got now were those thin, cabbagy meals three times a day. Then all at once, the meals became even thinner. The reason for this was that the toothpaste factory, the place where Mr Bucket worked, suddenly went bust and had to close down. Quickly, Mr Bucket tried to get another job. But he had no luck. In the end, the only way in which he managed to earn a few pennies was by shovelling snow in the streets. But it wasn’t enough to buy even a quarter of the food that seven people needed. The situation became desperate. Breakfast was a single slice of bread for each person now, and lunch was maybe half a boiled potato. Slowly but surely, everybody in the house began to starve. And every day, little Charlie Bucket, trudging through the snow on his way to school, would have to pass Mr Willy Wonka’s giant chocolate factory. And every day, as he came near to it, he would lift his small pointed nose high in the air and sni the wonderful sweet smell of melting chocolate. Sometimes, he would stand motionless outside the gates for several minutes on end, taking deep swallowing breaths as though he were trying to eat the smell itself. ‘That child,’ said Grandpa Joe, poking his head up from under the blanket one icy morning, ‘that child has got to have more food. It doesn’t matter about us. We’re too old to bother with. But a growing boy! He can’t go on like this! He’s beginning to look like a skeleton!’ ‘What can one do?’ murmured Grandma Josephine miserably. ‘He refuses to take any of ours. I hear his mother tried to slip her own piece of bread on to his plate at breakfast this morning, but he wouldn’t touch it. He made her take it back.’ ‘He’s a ne little fellow,’ said Grandpa George. ‘He deserves better than this.’ The cruel weather went on and on.And every day, Charlie Bucket grew thinner and thinner. His face became frighteningly white and pinched. The skin was drawn so tightly over the cheeks that you could see the shapes of the bones underneath. It seemed doubtful whether he could go on much longer like this without becoming dangerously ill. And now, very calmly, with that curious wisdom that seems to come so often to small children in times of hardship, he began to make little changes here and there in some of the things that he did, so as to save his strength. In the mornings, he left the house ten minutes earlier so that he could walk slowly to school, without ever having to run. He sat quietly in the classroom during break, resting himself, while the others rushed outdoors and threw snowballs and wrestled in the snow. Everything he did now, he did slowly and carefully, to prevent exhaustion. Then one afternoon, walking back home with the icy wind in his face (and incidentally feeling hungrier than he had ever felt before), his eye was caught suddenly by something silvery lying in the gutter, in the snow. Charlie stepped o the kerb and bent down to examine it. Part of it was buried under the snow, but he saw at once what it was. It was a fty-pence piece! Quickly he looked around him. Had somebody just dropped it? No – that was impossible because of the way part of it was buried. Several people went hurrying past him on the pavement, their chins sunk deep in the collars of their coats, their feet crunching in the snow. None of them was searching for any money; none of them was taking the slightest notice of the small boy crouching in the gutter. Then was it his, this fty pence? Could he have it? Carefully, Charlie pulled it out from under the snow. It was damp and dirty, but otherwise perfect.A WHOLE fty pence! He held it tightly between his shivering ngers, gazing down at it. It meant one thing to him at that moment, only one thing. It meant FOOD. Automatically, Charlie turned and began moving towards the nearest shop. It was only ten paces away… it was a newspaper and stationery shop, the kind that sells almost everything, including sweets and cigars… and what he would do, he whispered quickly to himself… he would buy one luscious bar of chocolate and eat it all up, every bit of it, right then and there… and the rest of the money he would take straight back home and give to his mother.11 The Miracle Charlie entered the shop and laid the damp fty pence on the counter. ‘One Wonka’s Whipple-Scrumptious Fudge-mallow Delight,’ he said, remembering how much he had loved the one he had on his birthday. The man behind the counter looked fat and well-fed. He had big lips and fat cheeks and a very fat neck. The fat around his neck bulged out all around the top of his collar like a rubber ring. He turned and reached behind him for the chocolate bar, then he turned back again and handed it to Charlie. Charlie grabbed it and quickly tore o the wrapper and took an enormous bite. Then he took another… and another… and oh, the joy of being able to cram large pieces of something sweet and solid into one’s mouth! The sheer blissful joy of being able to ll one’s mouth with rich solid food! ‘You look like you wanted that one, sonny,’ the shopkeeper said pleasantly. Charlie nodded, his mouth bulging with chocolate. The shopkeeper put Charlie’s change on the counter. ‘Take it easy,’ he said. ‘It’ll give you a tummy-ache if you swallow it like that without chewing.’ Charlie went on wol ng the chocolate. He couldn’t stop. And in less than half a minute, the whole thing had disappeared down his throat. He was quite out of breath, but he felt marvellously, extraordinarily happy. He reached out a hand to take the change. Then he paused. His eyes were just above the level of the counter. They were staring at the silver coins lying there. The coins were all. Vellore Institute of Technology • ENGLISH 02.

[PDF] DOWNLOAD READ Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Free download or read online Chairlie and the Chocolate Works: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory in Scots pdf (ePUB) book. The first edition of the novel was published in January 17th 1964, and was written by Roald Dahl. The book was published in multiple languages including Scots, consists of 192 pages and is available in Paperback format. The main characters of this childrens, fantasy story. Charlie-and-the-chocolate-factory 1/1 Downloaded from on April 4, 2022 by guest [PDF] Charlie And The Chocolate Factory When somebody should go to the book stores, search commencement by shop, shelf by shelf, it is in reality problematic. This is why we provide the book compilations in this website. Only Charlie Bucket, the story's earnest hero, stands to win the exotic riches of Wonka's empire—if he avoids the pitfalls of his fellow contestants and stays true to his heart. Ingenious and entertaining, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is a true modern classic by one of the most beloved storytellers of our time.

[PDF] DOWNLOAD READ Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Course Hero is not sponsored or endorsed by any college or university. Course Hero member to access this document. These quick, engaging activities help students enjoy the humorous literature of Roald Dahl. Cross-curricular before-, during-, and after-reading activities are provided for a comprehensive study of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

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