The hunger games book 3 free pdf download

The hunger games book 3 free pdf download

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Hunger games book 3 pdf free download | Rachel Sims's Ownd.

Catching Fire (Hunger Games, Book Two) Suzanne Collins. Scholastic Inc., Jun 1, 2010 – Young Adult Fiction – 400 pages. 3457 Reviews. Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has won the annual Hunger Games with fellow district tribute Peeta Mellark. But it was a victory won by defiance of the Capitol and their harsh rules.

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Hunger games book 3 pdf free download | Rachel Sims's Ownd.

Mockingjay (The Hunger Games, #3) by Suzanne Collins.

Mockingjay (Hunger Games, Book Three) – Google Play.

The Hunger Games Summer Novel Study Days of Instruction June ~ July 2013 ~ August Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Week1: Ch.1M4 1 Day 1 2 Day 2 3 Day 3 4 Holiday 5 Day 4 6 7 Week2:! Ch.5M9 8 Day 5 9 Day 6 10 Day 7 11 Day 8 12 Day 9 13 14 Week3: Ch.10M14 15 Day 10 16 Day 11 17 Day 12 18 Day 13 19 Day 14 20 21 Week4: Ch.15M19 22 Day 15 23 Day 16 24. We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us. Download. Hunger games 3 pdf download – The intelligent gardener growing nutrient dense food pdf, The Hunger Games is a trilogy of young adult dystopian novels written by American novelist Suzanne Collins. The seires is set in The novels were all well received. Z-PDF. Download. The Hunger Games {Book-1} Mocking Jay { Book-3}.

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Mockingjay (Hunger Games, Book Three) – Google Play.

Against all odds, Katniss Everdeen has survived the Hunger Games twice. But now that she’s made it out of the bloody arena alive, she’s still not safe. The Capitol is angry. The Capitol wants revenge. Who do they think should pay for the unrest? Katniss. And what’s worse, President Snow has made it clear that no one else is safe either. Not Katniss’s family, not her friends, not the people of District 12. Powerful and haunting, this thrilling final installment of Suzanne Collins’s groundbreaking The Hunger Games trilogy promises to be one of the most talked about books of the year. A Q&A with Suzanne Collins, Author of Mockingjay (The Final Book of The Hunger Games). Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked.

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An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker…. SLCC Radio play of the Hunger Games, Catching Fire and Mockingjay. Addeddate 2015-11-20 22:32:29 Identifier HungerGamesPart3… 03- Hunger Games part download. 8.4M. 04- Hunger Games part download. 9. The Hunger Games Word Formation. By Zora. A FCE word formation activity. Key Included. 1,666 Downloads. The Hunger Games (movie worksheet) By kras9. The worksheet is devoted to the movie "The Hunger Games". Give a task to students to watch the film at home and work on the worksheet.

The hunger games book 3 free pdf download book

Hunger games tome 2 pdf – 178.208.78.242.

This book goes over Keto, understanding it and the benefits it provides. Some of the benefits are reduced inflammation, stable energy, hunger control, brain health, weight loss, a potential diabetes therapy, a potential cancer therapy and endurance. When diet is wrong, medicine is of no use, when.

PDF CATCHING FIRE – Perpustakaan SMPN 1 Surabaya.

Download Hungergames Book 3 Pdf Book PDF. Download full Hungergames Book 3 Pdf books PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, Textbook, Mobi or read online Hungergames Book 3 Pdf anytime and anywhere on any device. Get free access to the library by create an account, fast download and ads free. Aug 24, 2010 · Mockingjay PDF book by Suzanne Collins (The Hunger Games #3) Read Online or Free Download in ePUB, PDF or MOBI eBooks. Published in August 24th 2010 the book DA: 93 PA: 100 MOZ Rank: 7.

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PDF CATCHING FIRE – Perpustakaan SMPN 1 Surabaya.

Uploaded by CarsCasts on June 18, Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. Books by Language. It appears your browser does not have it turned on. Please see your browser settings for this feature. EMBED for wordpress. Copyright © 2022 Rachel Sims's Ownd.

{epub download} Mockingjay The Hunger Games Book 3 PDF).

Free download or read online The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes pdf (ePUB) (The Hunger Games Series) book. The first edition of the novel was published in May 19th 2020, and was written by Suzanne Collins. The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists of 517 pages and is available in Hardcover format. The main characters of this young adult, science fiction story are ,. 1-30 von 10000 Ergebnissen für Blitzangebote oder Angebote & Aktionen Aktuell oder Abgelaufen. Sortieren nach. This Barnes & Noble YA Book Club Edition includes a reader's group guide and a Q&A with the author, Suzanne Collins, and her editor David Levithan. The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes will revisit the world of Panem sixty-four years before the events of The Hunger Games, starting on the morning of the reaping of the Tenth Hunger Games.

The hunger games book 3 free pdf download version

{epub download} Mockingjay The Hunger Games Book 3 PDF).

© 2019. All Rights Reserved. OverDrive uses cookies and similar technologies to improve your experience, monitor our performance, and understand overall usage trends for OverDrive services (including OverDrive websites and apps). We use this information to create a better experience for all users. Please review the types of cookies we use below. Wers the apple in the pig’s mouth and pins it to the wallbehind it. Everyone stares at me in disbelief. “Thank you for your consideration,” I say. Then I give aslight bow and walk straight toward the exit without beingdismissed. 101As I stride toward the elevator, I fling my bow to one sideand my quiver to the other. I brush past the gaping Avoxeswho guard the elevators and hit the number twelve buttonwith my fist. The doors slide together and I zip upward. I ac-tually make it back to my floor before the tears start runningdown my cheeks. I can hear the others calling me from the sit-ting room, but I fly down the hall into my room, bolt the door,and fling myself onto my bed. Then I really begin to sob. Now I’ve done it! Now I’ve ruined everything! If I’d stoodeven a ghost of chance, it vanished when I sent that arrow fly-ing at the Gamemakers. What will they do to me now? Arrestme? Execute me? Cut my tongue and turn me into an Avox so Ican wait on the future tributes of Panem? What was I thinking,shooting at the Gamemakers? Of course, I wasn’t, I was shoot-ing at that apple because I was so angry at being ignored. Iwasn’t trying to kill one of them. If I were, they’d be dead! Oh, what does it matter? It’s not like I was going to win theGames anyway. Who cares what they do to me? What reallyscares me is what they might do to my mother and Prim, howmy family might suffer now because of my impulsiveness. Willthey take their few belongings, or send my mother to prison 102Prim to the community home, or kill them? They wouldn’tkill them, would they? Why not? What do they care? I should have stayed and apologized. Or laughed, like it wasa big joke. Then maybe I would have found some leniency. Butinstead I stalked out of the place in the most disrespectfulmanner possible. Haymitch and Effie are knocking on my door. I shout forthem to go away and eventually they do. It takes at least anhour for me to cry myself out. Then I just lay curled up on thebed, stroking the silken sheets, watching the sun set over theartificial candy Capitol. At first, I expect guards to come for me. But as time passes,it seems less likely. I calm down. They still need a girl tributefrom District 12, don’t they? If the Gamemakers want to pu-nish me, they can do it publicly. Wait until I’m in the arena andsic starving wild animals on me. You can bet they’ll make sureI don’t have a bow and arrow to defend myself. Before that though, they’ll give me a score so low, no one intheir right mind would sponsor me. That’s what will happentonight. Since the training isn’t open to viewers, the Game-makers announce a score for each player. It gives the audiencea starting place for the betting that will continue throughoutthe Games. The number, which is between one and twelve,one being irredeemably bad and twelve being unattainablyhigh, signifies the promise of the tribute. The mark is not aguarantee of which person will win. It’s only an indication ofthe potential a tribute showed in training. Often, because ofthe variables in the actual arena, high-scoring tributes go 103n almost immediately. And a few years ago, the boy whowon the Games only received a three. Still, the scores can helpor hurt an individual tribute in terms of sponsorship. I hadbeen hoping my shooting skills might get me a six or a seven,even if I’m not particularly powerful. Now I’m sure I’ll havethe lowest score of the twenty-four. If no one sponsors me, myodds of staying alive decrease to almost zero. When Effie taps on the door to call me to dinner, I decide Imay as well go. The scores will be televised tonight. It’s notlike I can hide what happened forever. I go to the bathroomand wash my face, but it’s still red and splotchy. Everyone’s waiting at the table, even Cinna and Portia. Iwish the stylists hadn’t shown up because for some reason, Idon’t like the idea of disappointing them. It’s as if I’ve thrownaway all the good work they did on the opening ceremonieswithout a thought. I avoid looking at anyone as I take tinyspoonfuls of fish soup. The saltiness reminds me of my tears. The adults begin some chitchat about the weather forecast,and I let my eyes meet Peeta’s. He raises his eyebrows. A ques-tion. What happened? I just give my head a small shake. Then,as they’re serving the main course, I hear Haymitch say,“Okay, enough small talk, just how bad were you today?” Peeta jumps in. “I don’t know that it mattered. By the time Ishowed up, no one even bothered to look at me. They weresinging some kind of drinking song, I think. So, I threw aroundsome heavy objects until they told me I could go.” That makes me feel a bit better. It’s not like Peeta attackedthe Gamemakers, but at least he was provoked, too. 104“And you, sweetheart?” says Haymitch. Somehow Haymitch calling me sweetheart ticks me offenough that I’m at least able to speak. “I shot an arrow at theGamemakers.” Everyone stops eating. “You what?” The horror in Effie’svoice confirms my worse suspicions. “I shot an arrow at them. Not exactly at them. In their direc-tion. It’s like Peeta said, I was shooting and they were ignoringme and I just… I just lost my head, so I shot an apple out oftheir stupid roast pig’s mouth!” I say defiantly. “And what did they say?” says Cinna carefully. “Nothing. Or I don’t know. I walked out after that,” I say. “Without being dismissed?” gasps Effie. “I dismissed myself,” I said. I remember how I promisedPrim that I really would try to win and I feel like a ton of coalhas dropped on me. “Well, that’s that,” says Haymitch. Then he butters a roll. “Do you think they’ll arrest me?” I ask. “Doubt it. Be a painto replace you at this stage,” says Haymitch. “What about my family?” I say. “Will they punish them?” “Don’t think so. Wouldn’t make much sense. See they’dhave to reveal what happened in the Training Center for it tohave any worthwhile effect on the population. People wouldneed to know what you did. But they can’t since it’s secret, soit’d be a waste of effort,” says Haymitch. “More likely they’llmake your life hell in the arena.” “Well, they’ve already promised to do that to us any way,”says Peeta. 105“Very true,” says Haymitch. And I realize the impossible hashappened. They have actually cheered me up. Haymitch picksup a pork chop with his fingers, which makes Effie frown, anddunks it in his wine. He rips off a hunk of meat and starts tochuckle. “What were their faces like?” I can feel the edges of my mouth tilting up. “Shocked. Terri-fied. Uh, ridiculous, some of them.” An image pops into mymind. “One man tripped backward into a bowl of punch.” Haymitch guffaws and we all start laughing except Effie, al-though even she is suppressing a smile. “Well, it serves themright. It’s their job to pay attention to you. And just becauseyou come from District Twelve is no excuse to ignore you.”Then her eyes dart around as if she’s said something totallyoutrageous. “I’m sorry, but that’s what I think,” she says to noone in particular. “I’ll get a very bad score,” I say. “Scores only matter if they’re very good, no one pays muchattention to the bad or mediocre ones. For all they know, youcould be hiding your talents to get a low score on purpose.People use that strategy,” said Portia. “I hope that’s how people interpret the four I’ll probablyget,” says Peeta. “If that. Really, is anything less impressivethan watching a person pick up a heavy ball and throw it acouple of yards. One almost landed on my foot.” I grin at him and realize that I’m starving. I cut off a piece ofpork, dunk it in mashed potatoes, and start eating. It’s okay.My family is safe. And if they are safe, no real harm has beendone. 106After dinner, we go to sitting room to watch the scores an-nounced on television. First they show a photo of the tribute,then flash their score below it. The Career Tributes naturallyget in the eight-to-ten range. Most of the other players aver-age a five. Surprisingly, little Rue comes up with a seven. Idon’t know what she showed the judges, but she’s so tiny itmust have been impressive. District 12 comes up last, as usual. Peeta pulls an eight so atleast a couple of the Gamemakers must have been watchinghim. I dig my fingernails into my palms as my face comes up,expecting the worst. Then they’re flashing the number elevenon the screen. Eleven! Effie Trinket lets out a squeal, and everybody is slappingme on the back and cheering and congratulating me. But itdoesn’t seem real. “There must be a mistake. How… how could that happen?”I ask Haymitch. “Guess they liked your temper,” he says. “They’ve got ashow to put on. They need some players with some heat.” “Katniss, the girl who was on fire,” says Cinna and gives mea hug. “Oh, wait until you see your interview dress.” “Moreflames?” I ask. “Of a sort,” he says mischievously. Peeta and I congratulate each other, another awkwardmoment. We’ve both done well, but what does that mean forthe other? I escape to my room as quickly as possible and bur-row down under the covers. The stress of the day, particularly 107crying, has worn me out. I drift off, reprieved, relieved,and with the number eleven still flashing behind my eyelids. At dawn, I lie in bed for a while, watching the sun come upon a beautiful morning. It’s Sunday. A day off at home. I won-der if Gale is in the woods yet. Usually we devote all of Sundayto stocking up for the week. Rising early, hunting and gather-ing, then trading at the Hob. I think of Gale without me. Bothof us can hunt alone, but we’re better as a pair. Particularly ifwe’re trying for bigger game. But also in the littler things, hav-ing a partner lightened the load, could even make the arduoustask of filling my family’s table enjoyable. I had been struggling along on my own for about sixmonths when I first ran into Gale in the woods. It was a Sun-day in October, the air cool and pungent with dying things. I’dspent the morning competing with the squirrels for nuts andthe slightly warmer afternoon wading in shallow ponds har-vesting katniss. The only meat I’d shot was a squirrel that hadpractically run over my toes in its quest for acorns, but the an-imals would still be afoot when the snow buried my otherfood sources. Having strayed farther afield than usual, I washurrying back home, lugging my burlap sacks when I cameacross a dead rabbit. It was hanging by its neck in a thin wire afoot above my head. About fifteen yards away was another. Irecognized the twitch-up snares because my father had usedthem. When the prey is caught, it’s yanked into the air out ofthe reach of other hungry animals. I’d been trying to usesnares all summer with no success, so I couldn’t help droppingmy sacks to examine this one. My fingers were just on the wire 108ve one of the rabbits when a voice rang out. “That’s dan-gerous.” I jumped back several feet as Gale materialized from be-hind a tree. He must have been watching me the whole time.He was only fourteen, but he cleared six feet and was as goodas an adult to me. I’d seen him around the Seam and at school.And one other time. He’d lost his father in the same blast thatkilled mine. In January, I’d stood by while he received hismedal of valor in the Justice Building, another oldest childwith no father. I remembered his two little brothers clutchinghis mother, a woman whose swollen belly announced she wasjust days away from giving birth. “What’s your name?” he said, coming over and disengagingthe rabbit from the snare. He had another three hanging fromhis belt. “Katniss,” I said, barely audible. “Well, Catnip, stealing’s punishable by death, or hadn’t youheard?” he said. “Katniss,” I said louder. “And I wasn’t stealing it. I justwanted to look at your snare. Mine never catch anything.” He scowled at me, not convinced. “So where’d you get thesquirrel?” “I shot it.” I pulled my bow off my shoulder. I was still usingthe small version my father had made me, but I’d been practic-ing with the full-size one when I could. I was hoping that byspring I might be able to bring down some bigger game. Gale’s eyes fastened on the bow. “Can I see that?” I handedit over. “Just remember, stealing’s punishable by death.” 109That was the first time I ever saw him smile. It transformedhim from someone menacing to someone you wished youknew. But it took several months before I returned that smile. We talked hunting then. I told him I might be able to gethim a bow if he had something to trade. Not food. I wantedknowledge. I wanted to set my own snares that caught a beltof fat rabbits in one day. He agreed something might beworked out. As the seasons went by, we grudgingly began toshare our knowledge, our weapons, our secret places thatwere thick with wild plums or turkeys. He taught me snaresand fishing. I showed him what plants to eat and eventuallygave him one of our precious bows. And then one day, withouteither of us saying it, we became a team. Dividing the workand the spoils. Making sure that both our families had food. Gale gave me a sense of security I’d lacked since my father’sdeath. His companionship replaced the long solitary hours inthe woods. I became a much better hunter when I didn’t haveto look over my shoulder constantly, when someone waswatching my back. But he turned into so much more than ahunting partner. He became my confidante, someone withwhom I could share thoughts I could never voice inside thefence. In exchange, he trusted me with his. Being out in thewoods with Gale… sometimes I was actually happy. I call him my friend, but in the last year it’s seemed too ca-sual a word for what Gale is to me. A pang of longing shootsthrough my chest. If only he was with me now! But, of course,I don’t want that. I don’t want him in the arena where he’d be 110d in a few days. I just… I just miss him. And I hate beingso alone. Does he miss me? He must. I think of the eleven flashing under my name last night. Iknow exactly what he’d say to me. “Well, there’s some roomfor improvement there.” And then he’d give me a smile and I’dreturn it without hesitating now. I can’t help comparing what I have with Gale to what I’mpretending to have with Peeta. How I never question Gale’smotives while I do nothing but doubt the latter’s. It’s not a faircomparison really. Gale and I were thrown together by a mu-tual need to survive. Peeta and I know the other’s survivalmeans our own death. How do you sidestep that? Effie’s knocking at the door, reminding me there’s another“big, big, big day!” ahead. Tomorrow night will be our tele-vised interviews. I guess the whole team will have their handsfull readying us for that. I get up and take a quick shower, being a bit more carefulabout the buttons I hit, and head down to the dining room.Peeta, Effie, and Haymitch are huddled around the table talk-ing in hushed voices. That seems odd, but hunger wins outover curiosity and I load up my plate with breakfast before Ijoin them. The stew’s made with tender chunks of lamb and driedplums today. Perfect on the bed of wild rice. I’ve shoveledabout halfway through the mound when I realize no one’stalking. I take a big gulp of orange juice and wipe my mouth.“So, what’s going on? You’re coaching us on interviews today,right?” 111“That’s right,” says Haymitch. “You don’t have to wait until I’m done. I can listen and catat the same time,” I say. “Well, there’s been a change of plans. About our currentapproach,” says Haymitch. “What’s that?” I ask. I’m not sure what our current ap-proach is. Trying to appear mediocre in front of the other tri-butes is the last bit of strategy I remember. Haymitch shrugs. “Peeta has asked to be coached separate-ly.” 112Betrayal. That’s the first thing I feel, which is ludicrous. Forthere to be betrayal, there would have had to been trust first.Between Peeta and me. And trust has not been part of theagreement. We’re tributes. But the boy who risked a beatingto give me bread, the one who steadied me in the chariot, whocovered for me with the redheaded Avox girl, who insistedHaymitch know my hunting skills… was there some part ofme that couldn’t help trusting him? On the other hand, I’m relieved that we can stop the pre-tense of being friends. Obviously, whatever thin connectionwe’d foolishly formed has been severed. And high time, too.The Games begin in two days, and trust will only be a weak-ness. Whatever triggered Peeta’s decision — and I suspect ithad to do with my outperforming him in training — I shouldbe nothing but grateful for it. Maybe he’s finally accepted thefact that the sooner we openly acknowledge that we are ene-mies, the better. “Good,” I say. “So what’s the schedule?” “You’ll each have four hours with Effie for presentation andfour with me for content,” says Haymitch. “You start with Ef-fie, Katniss.” 113I can’t imagine what Effie will have to teach me that couldtake four hours, but she’s got me working down to the lastminute. We go to my rooms and she puts me in a full-lengthgown and high-heeled shoes, not the ones I’ll he wearing forthe actual interview, and instructs me on walking. The shoesare the worst part. I’ve never worn high heels and can’t getused to essentially wobbling around on the balls of my feet.But Effie runs around in them full-time, and I’m determinedthat if she can do it, so can I. The dress poses another problem.It keeps tangling around my shoes so, of course, I hitch it up,and then Effie swoops down on me like a hawk, smacking myhands and yelling, “Not above the ankle!” When I finally con-quer walking, there’s still sitting, posture — apparently I havea tendency to duck my head — eye contact, hand gestures, andsmiling. Smiling is mostly about smiling more. Effie makes mesay a hundred banal phrases starting with a smile, while smil-ing, or ending with a smile. By lunch, the muscles in my cheeksare twitching from overuse. “Well, that’s the best I can do,” Effie says with a sigh. “Justremember, Katniss, you want the audience to like you.” “And you don’t think they will?” I ask. “Not if you glare at them the entire time. Why don’t yousave that for the arena? Instead, think of yourself amongfriends,” says Effie. “They’re betting on how long I’ll live!” I burst out. “They’renot my friends!” 114“Well, try and pretend!” snaps Effie. Then she composesherself and beams at me. “See, like this. I’m smiling at youeven though you’re aggravating me.” “Yes, it feels very convincing,” I say. “I’m going to eat.” 1kick off my heels and stomp down to the dining room, hikingmy skirt up to my thighs. Peeta and Haymitch seem in pretty good moods, so I’mthinking the content session should be an improvement overthe morning. I couldn’t be more wrong. After lunch, Haymitchtakes me into the sitting room, directs me to the couch, andthen just frowns at me for a while. “What?” I finally ask. “I’m trying to figure out what to do with you,” he says.“How we’re going to present you. Are you going to be charm-ing? Aloof? Fierce? So far, you’re shining like a star. You volun-teered to save your sister. Cinna made you look unforgettable.You’ve got the top training score. People are intrigued, but noone knows who you are. The impression you make tomorrowwill decide exactly what I can get you in terms of sponsors,”says Haymitch. Having watched the tribute interviews all my life, I knowthere’s truth to what he’s saying. If you appeal to the crowd,either by being humorous or brutal or eccentric, you gain fa-vor. “What’s Peeta’s approach? Or am I not allowed to ask?” Isay. 115“Likable. He has a sort of self-deprecating humor naturally,”says Haymitch. “Whereas when you open your mouth, youcome across more as sullen and hostile.” “I do not!” I say. “Please. I don’t know where you pulled that cheery, wavygirl on the chariot from, but I haven’t seen her before orsince,” says Haymitch. “And you’ve given me so many reasons to be cheery,” Icounter. “But you don’t have to please me. I’m not going to sponsoryou. So pretend I’m the audience,” says Haymitch. “Delightme.” “Fine!” I snarl. Haymitch takes the role of the interviewerand I try to answer his questions in a winning fashion. But Ican’t. I’m too angry with Haymitch for what he said and that Ieven have to answer the questions. All I can think is how un-just the whole thing is, the Hunger Games. Why am I hoppingaround like some trained dog trying to please people I hate?The longer the interview goes on, the more my fury seems torise to the surface, until I’m literally spitting out answers athim. “All right, enough,” he says. “We’ve got to find another an-gle. Not only are you hostile, I don’t know anything about you.I’ve asked you fifty questions and still have no sense of yourlife, your family, what you care about. They want to knowabout you, Katniss.” 116“But I don’t want them to! They’re already taking my fu-ture! They can’t have the things that mattered to me in thepast!” I say. “Then lie! Make something up!” says Haymitch. “I’m not good at lying,” I say. “Well, you better learn fast. You’ve got about as muchcharm as a dead slug,” says Haymitch. Ouch. That hurts. Even Haymitch must know he’s been tooharsh because his voice softens. “Here’s an idea. Try actinghumble.” “Humble,” I echo. “That you can’t believe a little girl from District Twelve hasdone this well. The whole thing’s been more than you evercould have dreamed of. Talk about Cinna’s clothes. How nicethe people are. How the city amazes you. If you won’t talkabout yourself, at least compliment the audience. Just keepturning it back around, all right. Gush.” The next hours are agonizing. At once, it’s clear I cannotgush. We try me playing cocky, but I just don’t have the arrog-ance. Apparently, I’m too “vulnerable” for ferocity. I’m not wit-ty. Funny. Sexy. Or mysterious. By the end of the session, I am no one at all. Haymitchstarted drinking somewhere around witty, and a nasty edgehas crept into his voice. “I give up, sweetheart. Just answer thequestions and try not to let the audience see how openly youdespise them.” I have dinner that night in my room, ordering an outra-geous number of delicacies, eating myself sick, and then tak- 117out my anger at Haymitch, at the Hunger Games, at everyliving being in the Capitol by smashing dishes around myroom. When the girl with the red hair comes in to turn downmy bed, her eyes widen at the mess. “Just leave it!” I yell ather. “Just leave it alone!” I hate her, too, with her knowing reproachful eyes that callme a coward, a monster, a puppet of the Capitol, both now andthen. For her, justice must finally be happening. At least mydeath will help pay for the life of the boy in the woods. But instead of fleeing the room, the girl closes the door be-hind her and goes to the bathroom. She comes back with adamp cloth and wipes my face gently then cleans the bloodfrom a broken plate off my hands. Why is she doing this? Whyam I letting her? “I should have tried to save you,” I whisper. She shakes her head. Does this mean we were right to standby? That she has forgiven me? “No, it was wrong,” I say. She taps her lips with her fingers then points to my chest. Ithink she means that I would just have ended up an Avox, too.Probably would have. An Avox or dead. I spend the next hour helping the redheaded girl clean theroom. When all the garbage has been dropped down a dispos-al and the food cleaned away, she turns down my bed. I crawlin between the sheets like a five-year-old and let her tuck mein. Then she goes. I want her to stay until I fall asleep. To bethere when I wake up. I want the protection of this girl, eventhough she never had mine. 118In the morning, it’s not the girl but my prep team who arehanging over me. My lessons with Effie and Haymitch areover. This day belongs to Cinna. He’s my last hope. Maybe hecan make me look so wonderful, no one will care what comesout of my mouth. The team works on me until late afternoon, turning my skinto glowing satin, stenciling patterns on my arms, paintingflame designs on my twenty perfect nails. Then Venia goes towork on my hair, weaving strands of red into a pattern thatbegins at my left ear, wraps around my head, and then falls inone braid down my right shoulder. They erase my face with alayer of pale makeup and draw my features back out. Hugedark eyes, full red lips, lashes that throw off bits of light whenI blink. Finally, they cover my entire body in a powder thatmakes me shimmer in gold dust. Then Cinna enters with what I assume is my dress, but Ican’t really see it because it’s covered. “Close your eyes,” heorders. I can feel the silken inside as they slip it down over mynaked body, then the weight. It must be forty pounds. I clutchOctavia’s hand as I blindly step into my shoes, glad to findthey are at least two inches lower than the pair Effie had mepractice in. There’s some adjusting and fidgeting. Then si-lence. “Can I open my eyes?” I ask. “Yes,” says Cinna. “Open them.” The creature standing before me in the full-length mirrorhas come from another world. Where skin shimmers and eyes 119sh and apparently they make their clothes from jewels. Be-cause my dress, oh, my dress is entirely covered in reflectiveprecious gems, red and yellow and white with bits of blue thataccent the tips of the flame design. The slightest movementgives the impression I am engulfed in tongues of fire. I am not pretty. I am not beautiful. I am as radiant as thesun. For a while, we all just stare at me. “Oh, Cinna,” I finallywhisper. “Thank you.” “Twirl for me,” he says. I hold out my arms and spin in acircle. The prep team screams in admiration. Cinna dismisses the team and has me move around in thedress and shoes, which are infinitely more manageable thanEffie’s. The dress hangs in such a way that I don’t have to liftthe skirt when I walk, leaving me with one less thing to worryabout. “So, all ready for the interview then?” asks Cinna. I can seeby his expression that he’s been talking to Haymitch. That heknows how dreadful I am. “I’m awful. Haymitch called me a dead slug. No matter whatwe tried, I couldn’t do it. I just can’t be one of those people hewants me to be,” I say. Cinna thinks about this a moment. “Why don’t you just beyourself?” “Myself? That’s no good, either. Haymitch says I’m sullenand hostile,” I say. “Well, you are… around Haymitch,” says Cinna with a grin.“I don’t find you so. The prep team adores you. You even won 120r the Gamemakers. And as for the citizens of the Capitol,well, they can’t stop talking about you. No one can help butadmire your spirit.” My spirit. This is a new thought. I’m not sure exactly what itmeans, but it suggests I’m a fighter. In a sort of brave way. It’snot as if I’m never friendly. Okay, maybe I don’t go around lov-ing everybody I meet, maybe my smiles are hard to come by,but I do care for some people. Cinna takes my icy hands in his warm ones. “Suppose, whenyou answer the questions, you think you’re addressing afriend back home. Who would your best friend be?” asks Cin-na. “Gale,” I say instantly. “Only it doesn’t make sense, Cinna. Iwould never be telling Gale those things about me. He alreadyknows them.” “What about me? Could you think of me as a friend?” asksCinna. Of all the people I’ve met since I left home, Cinna is by farmy favorite. I liked him right off and he hasn’t disappointedme yet. “I think so, but —” “I’ll be sitting on the main platform with the other stylists.You’ll be able to look right at me. When you’re asked a ques-tion, find me, and answer it as honestly as possible,” says Cin-na. “Even if what I think is horrible?” I ask. Because it might be,really. “Especially if what you think is horrible,” says Cinna. “You’lltry it?” 121I nod. It’s a plan. Or at least a straw to grasp at. Too soon it’s time to go. The interviews take place on astage constructed in front of the Training Center. Once I leavemy room, it will be only minutes until I’m in front of thecrowd, the cameras, all of Panem. As Cinna turns the doorknob, I stop his hand. “Cinna…” I’mcompletely overcome with stage fright. “Remember, they already love you,” he says gently. “Just beyourself.” We meet up with the rest of the District 12 crowd at theelevator. Portia and her gang have been hard at work. Peetalooks striking in a black suit with flame accents. While we lookwell together, it’s a relief not to be dressed identically. Hay-mitch and Effie are all fancied up for the occasion. I avoidHaymitch, but accept Effie’s compliments. Effie can be tire-some and clueless, but she’s not destructive like Haymitch. When the elevator opens, the other tributes are being linedup to take the stage. All twenty-four of us sit in a big arcthroughout the interviews. I’ll be last, or second to last sincethe girl tribute precedes the boy from each district. How Iwish I could be first and get the whole thing out of the way!Now I’ll have to listen to how witty, funny, humble, fierce, andcharming everybody else is before I go up. Plus, the audiencewill start to get bored, just as the Gamemakers did. And I can’texactly shoot an arrow into the crowd to get their attention. Right before we parade onto the stage, Haymitch comes upbehind Peeta and me and growls, “Remember, you’re still ahappy pair. So act like it.” 122What? I thought we abandoned that when Peeta asked forseparate coaching. But I guess that was a private, not a publicthing. Anyway, there’s not much chance for interaction now,as we walk single-file to our seats and take our places. Just stepping on the stage makes my breathing rapid andshallow. I can feel my pulse pounding in my temples. It’s a re-lief to get to my chair, because between the heels and my legsshaking, I’m afraid I’ll trip. Although evening is falling, the CityCircle is brighter than a summer’s day. An elevated seatingunit has been set up for prestigious guests, with the stylistscommanding the front row. The cameras will turn to themwhen the crowd is reacting to their handiwork. A large balco-ny off a building to the right has been reserved for the Game-makers. Television crews have claimed most of the other bal-conies. But the City Circle and the avenues that feed into it arecompletely packed with people. Standing room only. At homesand community halls around the country, every television setis turned on. Every citizen of Panem is tuned in. There will beno blackouts tonight. Caesar Flickerman, the man who has hosted the interviewsfor more than forty years, bounces onto the stage. It’s a littlescary because his appearance has been virtually unchangedduring all that time. Same face under a coating of pure whitemakeup. Same hairstyle that he dyes a different color for eachHunger Games. Same ceremonial suit, midnight blue dottedwith a thousand tiny electric bulbs that twinkle like stars.They do surgery in the Capitol, to make people appear young-er and thinner. In District 12, looking old is something of an 123ievement since so many people die early. You see an elder-ly person you want to congratulate them on their longevity,ask the secret of survival. A plump person is envied becausethey aren’t scraping by like the majority of us. But here it isdifferent. Wrinkles aren’t desirable. A round belly isn’t a signof success. This year, Caesar’s hair is powder blue and his eyelids andlips are coated in the same hue. He looks freakish but lessfrightening than he did last year when his color was crimsonand he seemed to be bleeding. Caesar tells a few jokes towarm up the audience but then gets down to business. The girl tribute from District 1, looking provocative in asee-through gold gown, steps up the center of the stage to joinCaesar for her interview. You can tell her mentor didn’t haveany trouble coming up with an angle for her. With that flowingblonde hair, emerald green eyes, her body tall and lush.. ’s sexy all the way. Each interview only lasts three minutes. Then a buzzergoes off and the next tribute is up. I’ll say this for Caesar, hereally does his best to make the tributes shine. He’s friendly,tries to set the nervous ones at ease, laughs at lame jokes, andcan turn a weak response into a memorable one by the way hereacts. I sit like a lady, the way Effie showed me, as the districtsslip by. 2, 3, 4. Everyone seems to be playing up some angle.The monstrous boy from District 2 is a ruthless killing ma-chine. The fox-faced girl from District 5 sly and elusive. I spot-ted Cinna as soon as he took his place, but even his presence 124not relax me. 8, 9, 10. The crippled boy from 10 is veryquiet. My palms are sweating like crazy, but the jeweled dressisn’t absorbent and they skid right of if I try to dry them. 11. Rue, who is dressed in a gossamer gown complete withwings, flutters her way to Caesar. A hush falls over the crowdat the sight of this magical wisp of a tribute. Caesar’s verysweet with her, complimenting her seven in training, an excel-lent score for one so small. When he asks her what her great-est strength in the arena will be, she doesn’t hesitate. “I’mvery hard to catch,” she says in a tremulous voice. “And if theycan’t catch me, they can’t kill me. So don’t count me out.” “I wouldn’t in a million years,” says Caesar encouragingly. The boy tribute from District 11, Thresh, has the same darkskin as Rue, but the resemblance stops there. He’s one of thegiants, probably six and a half feet tall and built like an ox, butI noticed he rejected the invitations from the Career Tributesto join their crowd. Instead he’s been very solitary, speakingto no one, showing little interest in training. Even so, hescored a ten and it’s not hard to imagine he impressed theGamemakers. He ignores Caesar’s attempts at banter and an-swers with a yes or no or just remains silent. If only I was his size, I could get away with sullen and hos-tile and it would be just fine! I bet half the sponsors are atleast considering him. If I had any money, I’d bet on him my-self. And then they’re calling Katniss Everdeen, and I feel myself,as if in a dream, standing and making my way center stage. I 125ke Caesar’s outstretched hand, and he has the good gracenot to immediately wipe his off on his suit. “So, Katniss, the Capitol must be quite a change from Dis-trict Twelve. What’s impressed you most since you arrivedhere?” asks Caesar. What? What did he say? It’s as if the words make no sense. My mouth has gone as dry as sawdust. I desperately findCinna in the crowd and lock eyes with him. I imagine thewords coming from his lips. “What’s impressed you most sinceyou arrived here?” I rack my brain for something that mademe happy here. Be honest, I think. Be honest. “The lamb stew,” I get out. Caesar laughs, and vaguely I realize some of the audiencehas joined in. “The one with the dried plums?” asks Caesar. I nod. “Oh, Ieat it by the bucketful.” He turns sideways to the audience inhorror, hand on his stomach. “It doesn’t show, does it?” Theyshout reassurances to him and applaud. This is what I meanabout Caesar. He tries to help you out. “Now, Katniss,” he says confidentially, “When you came outin the opening ceremonies, my heart actually stopped. Whatdid you think of that costume?” Cinna raises one eyebrow at me. Be honest. “You mean af-ter I got over my fear of being burned alive?” I ask. Big laugh. A real one from the audience. “Yes. Start then,” says Caesar. Cinna, my friend, I should tell him anyway. “I thought Cinnawas brilliant and it was the most gorgeous costume I’d ever 126n and I couldn’t believe I was wearing it. I can’t believe I’mwearing this, either.” I lift up my skirt to spread it out. “I mean,look at it!” As the audience oohs and ahs, I see Cinna make the tiniestcircular motion with his finger. But I know what he’s saying.Twirl for me. I spin in a circle once and the reaction is immediate. “Oh, do that again!” says Caesar, and so I lift up my armsand spin around and around letting the skirt fly out, lettingthe dress engulf me in flames. The audience breaks intocheers. When I stop, I clutch Caesar’s arm. “Don’t stop!” he says. “I have to, I’m dizzy!” I’m also giggling, which I think I’vedone maybe never in my lifetime. But the nerves and thespinning have gotten to me. Caesar wraps a protective arm around me. “Don’t worry,I’ve got you. Can’t have you following in your mentor’s foot-steps.” Everyone’s hooting as the cameras find Haymitch, who isby now famous for his head dive at the reaping, and he wavesthem away good-naturedly and points back to me. “It’s all right,” Caesar reassures the crowd. “She’s safe withme. So, how about that training score. E-le-ven. Give us a hintwhat happened in there.” I glance at the Gamemakers on the balcony and bite my lip.“Um… all I can say, is I think it was a first.” The cameras are right on the Gamemakers, who are chuck-ling and nodding. 127“You’re killing us,” says Caesar as if in actual pain. “Details.Details.” I address the balcony. “I’m not supposed to talk about it,right?” The Gamemaker who fell in the punch bowl shouts out,“She’s not!” “Thank you,” I say. “Sorry. My lips are sealed.” “Let’s go back then, to the moment they called your sister’sname at the reaping,” says Caesar. His mood is quieter now.“And you volunteered. Can you tell us about her?” No. No, not all of you. But maybe Cinna. I don’t think I’mimagining the sadness on his face. “Her name’s Prim. She’s justtwelve. And I love her more than anything.” You could hear a pin drop in the City Circle now. “What did she say to you? After the reaping?” Caesar asks. Be honest. Be honest. I swallow hard. “She asked me to tryreally hard to win.” The audience is frozen, hanging on myevery word. “And what did you say?” prompts Caesar gently. But instead of warmth, I feel an icy rigidity take over mybody. My muscles tense as they do before a kill. When I speak,my voice seems to have dropped an octave. “I swore I would.” “I bet you did,” says Caesar, giving me a squeeze. The buzz-er goes off. “Sorry we’re out of time. Best of luck, KatnissEverdeen, tribute from District Twelve.” The applause continues long after I’m seated. I look to Cin-na for reassurance. He gives me a subtle thumbs-up. 128I’m still in a daze for the first part of Peeta’s interview. Hehas the audience from the get-go, though; I can hear themlaughing, shouting out. He plays up the baker’s son thing,comparing the tributes to the breads from their districts. Thenhas a funny anecdote about the perils of the Capitol showers.“Tell me, do I still smell like roses?” he asks Caesar, and thenthere’s a whole run where they take turns sniffing each otherthat brings down the house. I’m coming back into focus whenCaesar asks him if he has a girlfriend back home. Peeta hesitates, then gives an unconvincing shake of hishead. “Handsome lad like you. There must be some special girl.Come on, what’s her name?” says Caesar. Peeta sighs. “Well, there is this one girl. I’ve had a crush onher ever since I can remember. But I’m pretty sure she didn’tknow I was alive until the reaping.” Sounds of sympathy from the crowd. Unrequited love theycan relate to. “She have another fellow?” asks Caesar. “I don’t know, but a lot of boys like her,” says Peeta. “So, here’s what you do. You win, you go home. She can’tturn you down then, eh?” says Caesar encouragingly. “I don’t think it’s going to work out. Winning… won’t helpin my case,” says Peeta. “Why ever not?” says Caesar, mystified. Peeta blushes beet red and stammers out. “Because… be-cause… she came here with me.” 129PART II\"THE GAMES\" 130For a moment, the cameras hold on Peeta’s downcast eyesas what he says sinks in. Then I can see my face, mouth halfopen in a mix of surprise and protest, magnified on everyscreen as I realize, Me! He means me! I press my lips togetherand stare at the floor, hoping this will conceal the emotionsstarting to boil up inside of me. “Oh, that is a piece of bad luck,” says Caesar, and there’s areal edge of pain in his voice. The crowd is murmuring inagreement, a few have even given agonized cries. “It’s not good,” agrees Peeta. “Well, I don’t think any of us can blame you. It’d be hard notto fall for that young lady,” says Caesar. “She didn’t know?” Peeta shakes his head. “Not until now.” I allow my eyes to flicker up to the screen long enough tosee that the blush on my cheeks is unmistakable. “Wouldn’t you love to pull her back out here and get a re-sponse?” Caesar asks the audience. The crowd screams assent.“Sadly, rules are rules, and Katniss Everdeen’s time has beenspent. Well, best of luck to you, Peeta Mellark, and I think Ispeak for all of Panem when I say our hearts go with yours.” The roar of the crowd is deafening. Peeta has absolutelywiped the rest of us off the map with his declaration of love 131me. When the audience finally settles down, he chokes outa quiet “Thank you” and returns to his seat. We stand for theanthem. I have to raise my head out of the required respectand cannot avoid seeing that every screen is now dominatedby a shot of Peeta and me, separated by a few feet that in theviewers’ heads can never be breached. Poor tragic us. But I know better. After the anthem, the tributes file back into the TrainingCenter lobby and onto the elevators. I make sure to veer into acar that does not contain Peeta. The crowd slows our entou-rages of stylists and mentors and chaperones, so we have onlyeach other for company. No one speaks. My elevator stops todeposit four tributes before I am alone and then find the doorsopening on the twelfth floor. Peeta has only just stepped fromhis car when I slam my palms into his chest. He loses his bal-ance and crashes into an ugly urn filled with fake flowers. Theurn tips and shatters into hundreds of tiny pieces. Peeta landsin the shards, and blood immediately flows from his hands. “What was that for?” he says, aghast. “You had no right! No right to go saying those things aboutme!” I shout at him. Now the elevators open and the whole crew is there, Effie,Haymitch, Cinna, and Portia. “What’s going on?” says Effie, a note of hysteria in hervoice. “Did you fall?” “After she shoved me,” says Peeta as Effie and Cinna helphim up. Haymitch turns on me. “Shoved him?” 132“This was your idea, wasn’t it? Turning me into some kindof fool in front of the entire country?” I answer. “It was my idea,” says Peeta, wincing as he pulls spikes ofpottery from his palms. “Haymitch just helped me with it.” “Yes, Haymitch is very helpful. To you!” I say. “You are a fool,” Haymitch says in disgust. “Do you think hehurt you? That boy just gave you something you could neverachieve on your own.” “He made me look weak!” I say. “He made you look desirable! And let’s face it, you can useall the help you can get in that department. You were about asromantic as dirt until he said he wanted you. Now they all do.You’re all they’re talking about. The star-crossed lovers fromDistrict Twelve!” says Haymitch. “But we’re not star-crossed lovers!” I say. Haymitch grabs my shoulders and pins me against the wall.“Who cares? It’s all a big show. It’s all how you’re perceived.The most I could say about you after your interview was thatyou were nice enough, although that in itself was a small mi-racle. Now I can say you’re a heartbreaker. Oh, oh, oh, how theboys back home fall longingly at your feet. Which do you thinkwill get you more sponsors?” The smell of wine on his breath makes me sick. I shove hishands off my shoulders and step away, trying to clear myhead. Cinna comes over and puts his arm around me. “He’s right,Katniss.” 133I don’t know what to think. “I should have been told, so Ididn’t look so stupid.” “No, your reaction was perfect. If you’d known, it wouldn’thave read as real,” says Portia. “She’s just worried about her boyfriend,” says Peeta gruffly,tossing away a bloody piece of the urn. My cheeks burn again at the thought of Gale. “I don’t have aboyfriend.” “Whatever,” says Peeta. “But I bet he’s smart enough toknow a bluff when he sees it. Besides you didn’t say you lovedme. So what does it matter?” The words are sinking in. My anger fading. I’m torn now be-tween thinking I’ve been used and thinking I’ve been given anedge. Haymitch is right. I survived my interview, but what wasI really? A silly girl spinning in a sparkling, dress. Giggling. Theonly moment of any substance I hail was when I talked aboutPrim. Compare that with Thresh, his silent, deadly power, andI’m forgettable. Silly and sparkly and forgettable. No, not en-tirely forgettable, I have my eleven in training. But now Peeta has made me an object of love. Not just his.To hear him tell it I have many admirers. And if the audiencereally thinks we’re in love… I remember how strongly theyresponded to his confession. Star-crossed lovers. Haymitch isright, they eat that stuff up in the Capitol. Suddenly I’m wor-ried that I didn’t react properly. “After he said he loved me, did you think I could be in lovewith him, too?” I ask. 134“I did,” says Portia. “The way you avoided looking at thecameras, the blush.” They others chime in, agreeing. “You’re golden, sweetheart. You’re going to have sponsorslined up around the block,” says Haymitch. I’m embarrassed about my reaction. I force myself to ac-knowledge Peeta. “I’m sorry I shoved you.” “Doesn’t matter,” he shrugs. “Although it’s technically illeg-al.” “Are your hands okay?” I ask. “They’ll be all right,” he says. In the silence that follows, delicious smells of our dinnerwaft in from the dining room. “Come on, let’s eat,” says Hay-mitch. We all follow him to the table and take our places. Butthen Peeta is bleeding too heavily, and Portia leads him off formedical treatment. We start the cream and rose-petal soupwithout them. By the time we’ve finished, they’re back. Peeta’shands are wrapped in bandages. I can’t help feeling guilty.Tomorrow we will be in the arena. He has done me a favorand I have answered with an injury. Will I never stop owinghim? After dinner, we watch the replay in the sitting room. Iseem frilly and shallow, twirling and giggling in my dress, al-though the others assure me I am charming. Peeta actually ischarming and then utterly winning as the boy in love. Andthere I am, blushing and confused, made beautiful by Cinna’shands, desirable by Peeta’s confession, tragic by circumstance,and by all accounts, unforgettable. 135When the anthem finishes and the screen goes dark, a hushfalls on the room. Tomorrow at dawn, we will be roused andprepared for the arena. The actual Games don’t start until tenbecause so many of the Capitol residents rise late. But Peetaand I must make an early start. There is no telling how far wewill travel to the arena that has been prepared for this year’sGames. I know Haymitch and Effie will not be going with us. Assoon as they leave here, they’ll be at the Games Headquarters,hopefully madly signing up our sponsors, working out a strat-egy on how and when to deliver the gifts to us. Cinna and Por-tia will travel with us to the very spot from which we will belaunched into the arena. Still final good-byes must be saidhere. Effie takes both of us by the hand and, with actual tears inher eyes, wishes us well. Thanks us for being the best tributesit has ever been her privilege to sponsor. And then, becauseit’s Effie and she’s apparently required by law to say some-thing awful, she adds “I wouldn’t be at all surprised if I finallyget promoted to a decent district next year!” Then she kisses us each on the cheek and hurries out, over-come with either the emotional parting or the possible im-provement of her fortunes. Haymitch crosses his arms and looks us both over. “Any final words of advice?” asks Peeta. “When the gong sounds, get the hell out of there. You’reneither of you up to the blood bath at the Cornucopia. Just 136ar out, put as much distance as you can between yourselvesand the others, and find a source of water,” he says. “Got it?” “And after that?” I ask. “Stay alive,” says Haymitch. It’s the same advice he gave uson the train, but he’s not drunk and laughing this time. And weonly nod. What else is there to say? When I head to my room, Peeta lingers to talk to Portia. I’mglad. Whatever strange words of parting we exchange canwait until tomorrow. My covers are drawn back, but there isno sign of the redheaded Avox girl. I wish I knew her name. Ishould have asked it. She could write it down maybe. Or act itout. But perhaps that would only result in punishment for her. I take a shower and scrub the gold paint, the makeup, thescent of beauty from my body. All that remains of the design-team’s efforts are the flames on my nails. I decide to keepthem as reminder of who I am to the audience. Katniss, thegirl who was on fire. Perhaps it will give me something to holdon to in the days to come. I pull on a thick, fleecy nightgown and climb into bed. Ittakes me about five seconds to realize I’ll never fall asleep.And I need sleep desperately because in the arena every mo-ment I give in to fatigue will be an invitation to death. It’s no good. One hour, two, three pass, and my eyelidsrefuse to get heavy. I can’t stop trying to imagine exactly whatterrain I’ll be thrown into. Desert? Swamp? A frigid wastel-and? Above all I am hoping for trees, which may afford mesome means of concealment and food and shelter, Often thereare trees because barren landscapes are dull and the Games 137olve too quickly without them. But what will the climate belike? What traps have the Gamemakers hid den to liven up theslower moments? And then there are my fellow tributes… The more anxious I am to find sleep, the more it eludes me.Finally, I am too restless to even stay in bed. I pace the floor,heart beating too fast, breathing too short. My room feels likea prison cell. If I don’t get air soon, I’m going to start to throwthings again. I run down the hall to the door to the roof. It’snot only unlocked but ajar. Perhaps someone forgot to close it,but it doesn’t matter. The energy field enclosing the roof pre-vents any desperate form of escape. And I’m not looking to es-cape, only to fill my lungs with air. I want to see the sky andthe moon on the last night that no one will be hunting me. The roof is not lit at night, but as soon as my bare feel reachits tiled surface I see his silhouette, black against the lightsthat shine endlessly in the Capitol. There’s quite a commotiongoing on down in the streets, music and singing and car horns,none of which I could hear through the thick glass windowpanels in my room. I could slip away now, without him notic-ing me; he wouldn’t hear me over the din, But the night air’sso sweet, I can’t bear returning to that stuffy cage of a room.And what difference does it make? Whether we speak or not? My feet move soundlessly across the tiles. I’m only yard be-hind him when I say, “You should be getting some sleep.” He starts but doesn’t turn. I can see him give his head aslight shake. “I didn’t want to miss the party. It’s for us, afterall.” 138I come up beside him and lean over the edge of the rail. Thewide streets are full of dancing people. I squint to make outtheir tiny figures in more detail. “Are they in costumes?” “Who could tell?” Peeta answers. “With all the crazy clothesthey wear here. Couldn’t sleep, either?” “Couldn’t turn my mind off,” I say. “Thinking about your family?” he asks. “No,” I admit a bit guiltily. “All I can do is wonder about to-morrow. Which is pointless, of course.” In the light from be-low, I can see his face now, the awkward way he holds hisbandaged hands. “I really am sorry about your hands.” “It doesn’t matter, Katniss,” he says. “I’ve never been a con-tender in these Games anyway.” “That’s no way to be thinking,” I say. “Why not? It’s true. My best hope is to not disgrace myselfand…” He hesitates. “And what?” I say. “I don’t know how to say it exactly. Only… I want to die asmyself. Does that make any sense?” he asks. I shake my head.How could he die as anyone but himself? “I don’t want them tochange me in there. Turn me into some kind of monster thatI’m not.” I bite my lip feeling inferior. While I’ve been ruminating onthe availability of trees, Peeta has been struggling with how tomaintain his identity. His purity of self. “Do you mean youwon’t kill anyone?” I ask. “No, when the time comes, I’m sure I’ll kill just like every-body else. I can’t go down without a fight. Only I keep wishing 139ould think of a way to… to show the Capitol they don’t ownme. That I’m more than just a piece in their Games,” says Pee-ta. “But you’re not,” I say. “None of us are. That’s how theGames work.” “Okay, but within that framework, there’s still you, there’sstill me,” he insists. “Don’t you see?” “A little. Only… no offense, but who cares, Peeta?” I say. “I do. I mean, what else am I allowed to care about at thispoint?” he asks angrily. He’s locked those blue eyes on minenow, demanding an answer. I take a step back. “Care about what Haymitch said. Aboutstaying alive.” Peeta smiles at me, sad and mocking. “Okay. Thanks for thetip, sweetheart.” It’s like a slap in the face. His use of Haymitch’s patronizingendearment. “Look, if you want to spend the last hours of yourlife planning some noble death in the arena, that’s your choice.I want to spend mine in District Twelve.” “Wouldn’t surprise me if you do,” says Peeta. “Give mymother my best when you make it back, will you?” “Count on it,” I say. Then I turn and leave the roof. I spendthe rest of the night slipping in and out of a doze, imaginingthe cutting remarks I will make to Peeta Mellark in the morn-ing. Peeta Mellark. We will see how high and mighty he iswhen he's faced with life and death. He'll probably turn intoone of those raging beast tributes, the kind who tries to eatsomeone's heart after they've killed them. There was a guy 140e that a few years ago from District 6 called Titus. He wentcompletely savage and the Gamemakers had to have himstunned with electric guns to collect the bodies of the playershe'd killed before he ate them. There are no rules in the arena,but cannibalism doesn't play well with the Capitol audience,so they tried to head it off. There was some speculation thatthe avalanche that finally took Titus out was specifically engi-neered to ensure the victor was not a lunatic. I don't see Peeta in the morning. Cinna comes to me beforedawn, gives me a simple shift to wear, and guides me to theroof. My final dressing and preparations will be alone in thecatacombs under the arena itself. A hovercraft appears out ofthin air, just like the one did in the woods the day I saw theredheaded Avox girl captured, and a ladder drops down. Iplace my hands and feet on the lower rungs and instantly it'sas if I'm frozen. Some sort of current glues me to the ladderwhile I'm lifted safely inside. I expect the ladder to release me then, but I'm still stuckwhen a woman in a white coat approaches me carrying a sy-ringe. \"This is just your tracker, Katniss. The stiller you are,the more efficiently I can place it,\" she says. Still? I'm a statue. But that doesn't prevent me from feelingthe sharp stab of pain as the needle inserts the metal trackingdevice deep under the skin on the inside of my forearm. Nowthe Gamemakers will always be able to trace my whereaboutsin the arena. Wouldn’t want to lose a tribute. As soon as the tracker’s in place, the ladder releases me.The woman disappears and Cinna is retrieved from the roof, 141Avox boy comes in and directs us to a room where break-fast has been laid out. Despite the tension in my stomach, I eatas much as I can, although none of the delectable food makesany impression on me. I’m so nervous, I could be eating coaldust. The one thing that distracts me at all is the view from thewindows as we sail over the city and then to the wildernessbeyond. This is what birds see. Only they’re free and safe. Thevery opposite of me. The ride lasts about half an hour before the windows blackout, suggesting that we’re nearing the arena. The hovercraftlands and Cinna and I go back to the ladder, only this time itleads down into a tube underground, into the catacombs thatlie beneath the arena. We follow instructions to my destina-tion, a chamber for my preparation. In the Capitol, they call itthe Launch Room. In the districts, it’s referred to as the Stock-yard. The place animals go before slaughter. Everything is brand-new, I will be the first and only tributeto use this Launch Room. The arenas are historic sites, pre-served after the Games. Popular destinations for Capitol resi-dents to visit, to vacation. Go for a month, rewatch the Games,tour the catacombs, visit the sites where the deaths tookplace. You can even take part in reenactments. They say thefood is excellent. I struggle to keep my breakfast down as I shower and cleanmy teeth. Cinna does my hair in my simple trademark braiddown my back. Then the clothes arrive, the same for everytribute. Cinna has had no say in my outfit, does not even knowwhat will be in the package, but he helps me dress in the un- 142garments, simple tawny pants, light green blouse, sturdybrown belt, and thin, hooded black jacket that falls to mythighs. “The material in the jacket’s designed to reflect bodyheat. Expect some cool nights,” he says. The boots, worn over skintight socks, are better than Icould have hoped for. Soft leather not unlike my ones at home.These have a narrow flexible rubber sole with treads though.Good for running. I think I’m finished when Cinna pulls the gold mockingjaypin from his pocket. I had completely forgotten about it. “Where did you get that?” I ask. “Off the green outfit you wore on the train,” he says. I re-member now taking it off my mother’s dress, pinning it to theshirt. “It’s your district token, right?” I nod and he fastens it onmy shirt. “It barely cleared the review board. Some thoughtthe pin could be used as a weapon, giving you an unfair advan-tage. But eventually, they let it through,” says Cinna. “Theyeliminated a ring from that District One girl, though. If youtwisted the gemstone, a spike popped out. Poisoned one. Sheclaimed she had no knowledge the ring transformed and therewas no way to prove she did. But she lost her token. There,you’re all set. Move around. Make sure everything feels com-fortable.” I walk, run in a circle, swing my arms about. “Yes, it’s fine.Fits perfectly.” “Then there’s nothing to do but wait for the call,” says Cin-na. “Unless you think you could eat any more?” 143I turn down food but accept a glass of water that I take tinysips of as we wait on a couch. I don’t want to chew on my nailsor lips, so I find myself gnawing on the inside of my cheek. Itstill hasn’t fully healed from a few days ago. Soon the taste ofblood fills my mouth. Nervousness seeps into terror as I anticipate what is tocome. I could be dead, flat-out dead, in an hour. Not even. Myfingers obsessively trace the hard little lump on my forearmwhere the woman injected the tracking device. I press on it,even though it hurts, I press on it so hard a small bruise be-gins to form. “Do you want to talk, Katniss?” Cinna asks. I shake my head but after a moment hold out my hand tohim. Cinna encloses it in both of his. And this is how we sit un-til a pleasant female voice announces it’s time to prepare forlaunch. Still clenching one of Cinna’s hands, I walk over and standon the circular metal plate. “Remember what Haymitch said.Run, find water. The rest will follow,” he says. I nod. “And re-member this. I’m not allowed to bet, but if I could, my moneywould be on you.” “Truly?” I whisper. “Truly,” says Cinna. He leans down and kisses me on theforehead. “Good luck, girl on fire.” And then a glass cylinder islowering around me, breaking our handhold, cutting him offfrom me. He taps his fingers under his chin. Head high. I lift my chin and stand as straight as I can. The cylinder be-gins to rise. For maybe fifteen seconds, I’m in darkness and 144n I can feel the metal plate pushing me out of the cylinder,into the open air. For a moment, my eyes are dazzled by thebright sunlight and I’m conscious only of a strong wind withthe hopeful smell of pine trees. Then I hear the legendary announcer, Claudius Temples-mith, as his voice booms all around me. “Ladies and gentlemen, let the Seventy-fourth HungerGames begin!” 145Sixty seconds. That’s how long we’re required to stand onour metal circles before the sound of a gong releases us. Stepoff before the minute is up, and land mines blow your legs off.Sixty seconds to take in the ring of tributes all equidistantfrom the Cornucopia, a giant golden horn shaped like a conewith a curved tail, the mouth of which is at least twenty feethigh, spilling over with the things that will give us life here inthe arena. Food, containers of water, weapons, medicine, gar-ments, fire starters. Strewn around the Cornucopia are othersupplies, their value decreasing the farther they are from thehorn. For instance, only a few steps from my feet lays a three-foot square of plastic. Certainly it could be of some use in adownpour. But there in the mouth, I can see a tent pack thatwould protect from almost any sort of weather. If I had theguts to go in and fight for it against the other twenty-three tri-butes. Which I have been instructed not to do. We’re on a flat, open stretch of ground. A plain of hard-packed dirt. Behind the tributes across from me, I can seenothing, indicating either a steep downward slope or evencliff. To my right lies a lake. To my left and back, spars pineywoods. This is where Haymitch would want me to go. Imme-diately. 146I hear his instructions in my head. “Just clear out, put asmuch distance as you can between yourselves and the others,and find a source of water.” But it’s tempting, so tempting, when I see the bounty wait-ing there before me. And I know that if I don’t get it, someoneelse will. That the Career Tributes who survive the bloodbathwill divide up most of these life-sustaining spoils. Somethingcatches my eye. There, resting on a mound of blanket rolls, is asilver sheath of arrows and a bow, already strung, just waitingto be engaged. That’s mine, I think. It’s meant for me. I’m fast. I can sprint faster than any of the girls in ourschool although a couple can beat me in distance races. Butthis forty-yard length, this is what I am built for. I know I canget it, I know I can reach it first, but then the question is howquickly can I get out of there? By the time I’ve scrambled upthe packs and grabbed the weapons, others will have reachedthe horn, and one or two I might be able to pick off, but saythere’s a dozen, at that close range, they could take me downwith the spears and the clubs. Or their own powerful fists. Still, I won’t be the only target. I’m betting many of the oth-er tributes would pass up a smaller girl, even one who scoredan eleven in training, to take out their more fierce adversaries. Haymitch has never seen me run. Maybe if he had he’d tellme to go for it. Get the weapon. Since that’s the very weaponthat might be my salvation. And I only see one bow in thatwhole pile. I know the minute must be almost up and will haveto decide what my strategy will be and I find myself position-ing my feet to run, not away into the stir rounding forests but 147ard the pile, toward the bow. When suddenly I notice Pee-ta, he’s about five tributes to my right, quite a fair distance,still I can tell he’s looking at me and I think he might be shak-ing his head. But the sun’s in my eyes, and while I’m puzzlingover it the gong rings out. And I’ve missed it! I’ve missed my chance! Because thoseextra couple of seconds I’ve lost by not being ready areenough to change my mind about going in. My feet shuffle fora moment, confused at the direction my brain wants to takeand then I lunge forward, scoop up the sheet of plastic and aloaf of bread. The pickings are so small and I’m so angry withPeeta for distracting me that I sprint in twenty yards to re-trieve a bright orange backpack that could hold anything be-cause I can’t stand leaving with virtually nothing. A boy, I think from District 9, reaches the pack at the sametime I do and for a brief time we grapple for it and then hecoughs, splattering my face with blood. I stagger back, re-pulsed by the warm, sticky spray. Then the boy slips to theground. That’s when I see the knife in his back. Already othertributes have reached the Cornucopia and are spreading outto attack. Yes, the girl from District 2, ten yards away, runningtoward me, one hand clutching a half-dozen knives. I’ve seenher throw in training. She never misses. And I’m her next tar-get. All the general fear I’ve been feeling condenses into at im-mediate fear of this girl, this predator who might kill me inseconds. Adrenaline shoots through me and I sling the packover one shoulder and run full-speed for the woods. I can hear 148blade whistling toward me and reflexively hike the packup to protect my head. The blade lodges in the pack. Bothstraps on my shoulders now, I make for the trees. Somehow Iknow the girl will not pursue me. That she’ll be drawn back in-to the Cornucopia before all the good stuff is gone. A grincrosses my face. Thanks for the knife, I think. At the edge of the woods I turn for one instant to survey thefield. About a dozen or so tributes are hacking away at oneanother at the horn. Several lie dead already on the ground.Those who have taken flight are disappearing into the trees orinto the void opposite me. I continue running until the woodshave hidden me from the other tributes then slow into asteady jog that I think I can maintain for a while. For the nextfew hours, I alternate between jogging and walking, putting asmuch distance as I can between myself and my competitors. Ilost my bread during the struggle with the boy from District 9but managed to stuff my plastic in my sleeve so as I walk I foldit neatly and tuck it into a pocket. I also free the knife — it’s afine one with a long sharp blade, serrated near the handle,which will make it handy for sawing through things — andslide it into my belt. I don’t dare stop to examine the contentsof the pack yet. I just keep moving, pausing only to check forpursuers. I can go a long time. I know that from my days in thewoods. But I will need water. That was Haymitch’s second in-struction, and since I sort of botched the first, I keep a sharpeye out for any sign of it. No luck. 149The woods begin to evolve, and the pines are intermixedwith a variety of trees, some I recognize, some completely for-eign to me. At one point, I hear a noise and pull my knife,thinking I may have to defend myself, but I’ve only startled arabbit. “Good to see you,” I whisper. If there’s one rabbit, therecould be hundreds just waiting to be snared. The ground slopes down. I don’t particularly like this. Val-leys make me feel trapped. I want to be high, like in the hillsaround District 12, where I can see my enemies approaching.But I have no choice but to keep going. Funny though, I don’t feel too bad. The days of gorging my-self have paid off. I’ve got staying power even though I’mshort on sleep. Being in the woods is rejuvenating. I’m glad forthe solitude, even though it’s an illusion, because I’m probablyon-screen right now. Not consistently but off and on. Thereare so many deaths to show the first day that a tribute trekk-ing through the woods isn’t much to look at. But they’ll showme enough to let people know I’m alive, uninjured and on themove. One of the heaviest days of betting is the opening, whenthe initial casualties come in. But that can’t compare to whathappens as the field shrinks to a handful of players. It’s late afternoon when I begin to hear the cannons. Eachshot represents a dead tribute. The fighting must have finallystopped at the Cornucopia. They never collect the bloodbathbodies until the killers have dispersed. On the opening day,they don’t even fire the cannons until the initial fighting’s overbecause it’s too hard to keep track of the fatalities. I allow my-self to pause, panting, as I count the shots. One… two… 150.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 – Wikipedia.

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(PDF) Download Mockingjay (The Hunger Games, Book 3) by Suzanne Collins, Publisher Scholastic Press, Category Fiction, ISBN 0439023513.

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Switch to English sign up. Phone or email. Don’t remember me. Christina Robinson Post. Losing means certain death. The nation of Panem, formed from a post-apocalyptic North America, is a country that consists of a wealthy Capitol region surrounded by 12 poorer districts. Hunger Games 1 The Hunger Games – PDF Free Download.

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For products worth more than INR 25000, we only offer Self-Return option. The World of the Hunger Gamesby Kate Egan. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

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Foreign publishing rights for The Hunger Games Trilogy have been sold in 54 languages to 52 territories to date. In Lionsgate launched the first of four films based on the novels, starring Jennifer Lawrence. File Name: hunger games book 3 free Size: 46380 Kb. Hunger games is a wonderful journey of katenis. Addeddate. 2017-11-28 14:26:39. Identifier. HungerGames_201711. Identifier-ark. ark:/13960/t84j6vd0r. Ocr. ABBYY FineReader 11.0 (Extended OCR).

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The hunger games by Suzanne Collins pdf free download is an action novel. The story of the book is based on fiction. Moreover, the tale plotted in the nation Panem in North America. The Capitol, a highly advanced metropolitan, have control over the land. Twelve districts surround the central city, and metropolitan have control over all regions. Book 1 – The Hunger G – Google Docs… Loading…. 3. • The Hunger Games is a 2008 novel written by Suzanne Collins where a 16-year-old girl named Katniss Everdeen narrates the story in Panem that contains a Capitol and 12 Districts that surround it.

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The Hunger Games Themes. T he main themes in The Hunger Games are friendship, family, freedom versus oppression, and materialism.. Friendship and family: Friendship and familial bonds are figured.

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A:Very much so. While I didn’t know every detail, of course, the arc of the story from gladiator game, to revolution, to war, to the eventual outcome remained constant throughout the writing process.

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This is day 3 of my Hunger Games binge after I watched the last movie last Saturday without knowing anything about the books and not having watched any of the movies. First book. Awesome.

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Set in the shining Capitol and brutal dystopian world of Panem, built on the ruins of North America, The Hunger Games trilogy and its prequel, The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes, explore the effects of violence and media sensationalism on young people—through the gripping story of a brave and fierce teenage girl. 16-year-old Katniss Everdeen lives in the poorest sector of Panem—its coal. The Hunger Games. Suzanne Collins. Scholastic Inc., 2008 – Juvenile Fiction – 374 pages. 1544 Reviews. Now in paperback, the book no one can stop talking about… In the ruins of a place once known as North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by twelve outlying districts. The Capitol is harsh and cruel and keeps.

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A:Questions about how elements of the books might be relevant in their own lives. And, if they’re disturbing, what they might do about them. A:There were several significant differences. Time, for starters. When you’re adapting a novel into a two-hour movie you can’t take everything with you. The story has to be condensed to fit the new form. Then there’s the question of how best to take a book told in the first person and present tense and transform it into a satisfying dramatic experience. In the novel, you never leave Katniss for a second and are privy to all of her thoughts so you need a way to dramatize her inner world and to make it possible for other characters to exist outside of her company. Finally, there’s the challenge of how to present the violence while still maintaining a PG-13 rating so that your core audience can view it. A lot of things are acceptable on a page that wouldn’t be on a screen. But how certain moments are depicted will ultimately be in the director’s hands. The Hunger But Mainly Death Games: A Parody.

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This is purely an act of random fiction. Any murderous acts are not to be taken seriously. This is based on the Hunger Games franchise, originating from Suzanne Collins' book series. BrantS;s Hunger Games Simulator is a fan-created, non-profit work. The latest Lifestyle | Daily Life news, tips, opinion and advice from The Sydney Morning Herald covering life and relationships, beauty, fashion, health & wellbeing.

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A:Hiding. I’d be scaling those trees like Katniss and Rue. Since I was trained in sword-fighting, I guess my best hope would be to get hold of a rapier if there was one available. But the truth is I’d probably get about a four in Training. Q: We understand you worked on the initial screenplay for a film to be based on The Hunger Games. What is the biggest difference between writing a novel and writing a screenplay?.

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